Ecosystem Approach Sourcebook - Case-Study Details

 
1. Project Details
Author or Responsible Organization R. D. Smith and E. Maltby. (2003). Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity: Key Issues and Case Studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x +118 pp.
Project Title South Buffer Zone of the Beni Biological Station Biosphere Reserve, Bolivia
Date of Publication
Project Status Completed
Project Start Date
Project End Date
Countries
Regions
Funding Source
 
2. Background to Project
Project Issue/Problem Statement At the beginning of the 1990s, an ongoing initiative was launched in the Beni Station Biosphere Reserve. Its aim was to achieve a balance between biodiversity conservation and autonomous sustainable development of the indigenous and local populations located in the vicinity of the biosphere reserve. Without this initiative both the biodiversity of the reserve and the well-being of local people were likely to deteriorate.
Project Description To achieve the objective, four main actions were proposed:(1) updating the land tenure system and the official land register, (2) enhancing the economic and productive output of the region, (3) strengthening biodiversity conservation and (4) improving the living conditions of the local population. A joint planning initiative resulted in a zoning proposal for the buffer zone that was compatible with the needs of the local population and the conservation objectives of the reserve. A committee was established to oversee the implementation of a working plan. The project ’s goal was to strengthen indigenous social organizations and their management capabilities. The recovery of traditional botanical knowledge, agricultural and forestry practices and the socio-economic diagnosis of local populations was the context for launching a management project of the reserve ’s buffer zones. These efforts led to the development of a strategic management plan for the south buffer zone.
Highlighted Aspects of Ecosystem Approach · Conservation, sustainable use and equitable sharing of the benefits were addressed.· Greater understanding of ecosystem functioning was not highlighted. · Biodiversity components traditionally used for food and pharmaceutical purposes were recognized as goods and services, the recipients of which were the local indigenous peoples and farming communities.· The case study illustrates adaptive management. · The local-indigenous level was identified as the appropriate working scale for addressing the issues. · Linkages and responsibilities of the various sectoral components were identified. Among the sectoral groups identified were: the national Institute for the Agrarian Reform, the Forestry Superintendence, the General Biodiversity Directive, the National Protected Areas Service, the General Direction of Land Ordering, the San Borja and Santa Ana Municipalities, the Beni Departmental Authority and the South Buffer Zone Integral Development Local Committee.
Conclusions · Ongoing long-term participatory processes have produced positive results through the development of strategic management plans.· The participatory process must be flexible and dynamic. A range of participants and components of the process should be involved from the beginning, even during the planning and discussion stages.
 
3. Sectors and Biomes
Sectors
Biomes Agricultural Biodiversity
Dry and Sub-Humid Lands Biodiversity
Forest Biodiversity
 
4. Tools and Approaches
Tools and Approaches   Relevance
Score
  Further
Information
Public Participation 3-High
- Local community approaches 3-High
Governance, Law and Policy 3-High
- Assessment Techniques 3-High
Management and Incentives 3-High
- Adaptive management 3-High
Protected Areas and Land Use Policy 3-High
- Protected/managed areas 3-High
Cross-sectoral Research and Working 3-High
 
5. Issues
Issues   Relevance
Score
Public Participation 3-High
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity 3-High
Traditional Knowledge, Innovations and Practices - Article 8(j) 3-High
 
6. Ecosystem Approach
Principles and Operational Guidance   Relevance
Score
  Reason
(Only if NOT relevant)
Principle 1: The objectives of management of land, water and living resources are a matter of societal choices 3-High
Principle 2: Management should be decentralized to the lowest appropriate level 3-High
Principle 3: Ecosystem managers should consider the effects (actual or potential) of their activities on adjacent and other ecosystems 3-High
Principle 4: Recognizing potential gains from management, there is usually a need to understand and manage the ecosystem in an economic context 3-High
Principle 5: Conservation of ecosystem structure and functioning, in order to maintain ecosystem services, should be a priority target of the ecosystem approach 3-High
Principle 6: Ecosystem must be managed within the limits of their functioning 3-High
Principle 7: The ecosystem approach should be undertaken at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales 3-High
Principle 8: Recognizing the varying temporal scales and lag-effects that characterize ecosystem processes, objectives for ecosystem management should be set for the long term 3-High
Principle 9: Management must recognize the change is inevitable 3-High
Principle 10: The ecosystem approach should seek the appropriate balance between, and integration of, conservation and use of biological diversity 3-High
Principle 11: The ecosystem approach should consider all forms of relevant information, including scientific and indigenous and local knowledge, innovations and practices 3-High
Principle 12: The ecosystem approach should involve all relevant sectors of society and scientific disciplines 3-High
Operational Guidance A: Focus on the relationships and processes within ecosystem 3-High
Operational Guidance B: Enhance benefit-sharing 3-High
Operational Guidance C: Use adaptive management practices 3-High
Operational Guidance D: Carry out management actions at the scale appropriate for the issue being addressed, with decentralization to lowest level, as appropriate 3-High
Operational Guidance E: Ensure intersectoral cooperation 3-High
 
7. Lessons Learned and the Outcomes
Lessons Learned · In this case study, the long on-going participatory processes have shown positive results through the development of strategic management plans.· The participatory process must be flexible and dynamic.· Different actors and components of the process should be involved from the beginning during the planning and discussion stages.
Outcomes
Other Information
 
8. References
References R. D. Smith and E. Maltby. (2003). Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity: Key Issues and Case Studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x +118 pp.
 
9. Contact Details
Contact Person Ms Leah Mohammed
Job Title Intern
Organization CBD
Address Montreal World Trade Centre
393 Saint-Jaques, 8th floor
Postal Code H2Y 1N9
City Montreal
ZIP/State/Province Quebec
Country Canada
Telephone 514-288-2220
E-mail Address leah.mohammed@biodiv.org
 
 

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  • United Nations Environment Programme