Ecosystem Approach Sourcebook - Case-Study Details

 
1. Project Details
Author or Responsible Organization R. D. Smith and E. Maltby. (2003). Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity: Key Issues and Case Studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x +118 pp.
Project Title Vinalares sylvo-pastoral management, Formosa, Argentina
Date of Publication
Project Status Completed
Project Start Date
Project End Date
Countries Argentina
Regions
Funding Source
 
2. Background to Project
Project Issue/Problem Statement Vinal (Prosopis ruscifolia) is an aggressive and invasive shrub species that usually affects over-grazed savannas, transforming them into dense shrub land. Although numerous attempts were made to eradicate vinal during the 1970s in order to restore grazing and foraging areas, these efforts were only effective in the short term. In the long term they resulted in stronger recolonization. In addition, the eradication of vinal was very expensive.
Project Description Application of an alternative strategy, sylvo-pastoral management, has improved the foraging quality of lands invaded by vinal at no net cost to livestock producers. This strategy involves the pruning and thinning of trees, together with the management of grazing by cattle. Native flora species were incorporated into the system and monitored in the second phase of the project. Experimental sylvo-pastoral management plots were identified by local groups of small producers. Mature and diseased vinal trees were cut down in each plot. This phase of the project produced useful products: charcoal and timber for floorboards. A cost-benefit analysis was made for the production and yield of these products. Marketing the products was undertaken through local cooperatives.
Highlighted Aspects of Ecosystem Approach · Conservation, equitable sharing of benefits and sustainable use of the resources were simultaneously addressed. · An understanding of the functional relationships and processes in the vinal ecosystem, especially since 1993 through the work of the GESER Group (Group of Regional Ecological Studies) was important. · Floorboards, charcoal production and the expansion of grazing lands were identified as the services produced by the sylvo-pastoral system. Benefit sharing was addressed by cooperatives, which distributed revenues from the sale of wood products. · Adaptive management is not illustrated in the case study. · The appropriate scale of management was identified to be the local level, where local producers, cooperatives, technicians and scientists were the main participants. · Linkages between different sectoral groups were established through co-operation between the scientific sector, governmental and non-governmental organizations and small local producers.
Conclusions · Marketing of products obtained from the natural system was vital to the success of the project. · Cooperative and integrated work proved to be a good management strategy.· Local-level initiatives that improve local environmental policies benefit from support at the regional and national levels.
 
3. Sectors and Biomes
Sectors
Biomes Dry and Sub-Humid Lands Biodiversity
Forest Biodiversity
Inland Waters Biodiversity
 
4. Tools and Approaches
Tools and Approaches   Relevance
Score
  Further
Information
Public Participation 3-High
Governance, Law and Policy 3-High
- Assessment Techniques 3-High
- Policy development, planning and reform 3-High
Cross-sectoral Research and Working 3-High
 
5. Issues
Issues   Relevance
Score
Identification, Monitoring and Indicators 3-High
Invasive Alien Species 3-High
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity 3-High
Traditional Knowledge, Innovations and Practices - Article 8(j) 3-High
 
6. Ecosystem Approach
Principles and Operational Guidance   Relevance
Score
  Reason
(Only if NOT relevant)
Principle 1: The objectives of management of land, water and living resources are a matter of societal choices 3-High
Principle 2: Management should be decentralized to the lowest appropriate level 3-High
Principle 3: Ecosystem managers should consider the effects (actual or potential) of their activities on adjacent and other ecosystems 3-High
Principle 4: Recognizing potential gains from management, there is usually a need to understand and manage the ecosystem in an economic context 3-High
Principle 5: Conservation of ecosystem structure and functioning, in order to maintain ecosystem services, should be a priority target of the ecosystem approach 3-High
Principle 6: Ecosystem must be managed within the limits of their functioning 3-High
Principle 7: The ecosystem approach should be undertaken at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales 3-High
Principle 8: Recognizing the varying temporal scales and lag-effects that characterize ecosystem processes, objectives for ecosystem management should be set for the long term 3-High
Principle 10: The ecosystem approach should seek the appropriate balance between, and integration of, conservation and use of biological diversity 3-High
Principle 12: The ecosystem approach should involve all relevant sectors of society and scientific disciplines 3-High
Operational Guidance A: Focus on the relationships and processes within ecosystem 3-High
Operational Guidance B: Enhance benefit-sharing 3-High
Operational Guidance C: Use adaptive management practices 3-High
Operational Guidance D: Carry out management actions at the scale appropriate for the issue being addressed, with decentralization to lowest level, as appropriate 3-High
Operational Guidance E: Ensure intersectoral cooperation 3-High
 
7. Lessons Learned and the Outcomes
Lessons Learned · Marketing of products obtained from the natural system is identified as a vital component for the success of the project.· Co-operative and integrated work proved to be a good management strategy.· Local level initiatives that improve local environmental policies benefit from support at the national and regional levels.
Outcomes
Other Information
 
8. References
References R. D. Smith and E. Maltby. (2003). Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity: Key Issues and Case Studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x +118 pp.
 
9. Contact Details
Contact Person Ms Leah Mohammed
Job Title Intern
Organization CBD
Address Montreal World Trade Centre
393 Saint-Jaques, 8th floor
Postal Code H2Y 1N9
City Montreal
ZIP/State/Province Quebec
Country Canada
Telephone 514-288-2220
E-mail Address leah.mohammed@biodiv.org
 
 

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