Ecosystem Approach Sourcebook - Case-Study Details

 
1. Project Details
Author or Responsible Organization R D Smith and E Maltby. (2003) 'Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity: Key issues and case studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK x + 118pp.
Project Title The Zambezi Basin Wetlands Conservation and Resource Utilization Project
Date of Publication
Project Status Completed
Project Start Date
Project End Date
Countries
Regions Africa
Funding Source
 
2. Background to Project
Project Issue/Problem Statement The project aimed to conserve the Zambezi Basin wetland ecosystems while facilitating their sustainable use.
Project Description An integrated, multi-national approach to management was promoted to address the ecological degradation resulting from the unsustainable use of wetland resources. There were two main types of activity:(1)wetland conservation and (2)community well-being. The achievements were:(1) Zambezi basin biodiversity assessment, which identified priorities and provided a baseline inventory; introduction of resource-based management regimes, which encouraged resource use to be more sustainable; economic evaluation of wetland resources, which has helped raise local awareness and develop regional policies.(2)Health, education, food security, income and cultural values were enhanced. It was necessary to first address community well-being and try to meet people ’s immediate needs before addressing the conservation goals of the project. Highlighted aspects of the Ecosystem Approach • It was necessary to first focus on enhancing socio- economic conditions and sustainable use before turning to conservation and use. • Economic valuations of goods and services were undertaken at regional and local scales. • The immediate delivery of benefits to the people responsible for conservation and sustainable use is vital. • Maintaining ecosystem functioning across the basin (and the value of products locally)was a high-priority objective. •A multi-scale approach was taken:the economic valuation of goods,services and biodiversity were undertaken at the local and basin levels,and activities were targeted at the local (village-level institutions established and local bylaws passed)and transboundary scales. • Improvements to the conservation and ecosystem service status of site studies were not fully evident within the five-year project period. • The project aimed to make use of multidisciplinary scientific and traditional knowledge.
Highlighted Aspects of Ecosystem Approach Highlighted aspects of the Ecosystem Approach • It was necessary to first focus on enhancing socio- economic conditions and sustainable use before turning to conservation and use. • Economic valuations of goods and services were undertaken at regional and local scales. • The immediate delivery of benefits to the people responsible for conservation and sustainable use is vital. • Maintaining ecosystem functioning across the basin (and the value of products locally)was a high-priority objective. •A multi-scale approach was taken:the economic valuation of goods,services and biodiversity were undertaken at the local and basin levels,and activities were targeted at the local (village-level institutions established and local bylaws passed)and transboundary scales. • Improvements to the conservation and ecosystem service status of site studies were not fully evident within the five-year project period. • The project aimed to make use of multidisciplinary scientific and traditional knowledge.
Conclusions Conservation and sustainable use objectives cannot be achieved unless education,health,gender equity, transport and incomes and human well-being are first addressed. •Local-level economic resource valuation helped build awareness of the need for measures to ensure the sustainable use of the resource base. • Popular media (radio plays and songs)using local community artists were important for building awareness of wetland values and sustainable use. • Regional economic valuation of resources assisted in integrated transboundary planning within the basin. • To be more useful,the biodiversity study report needs to be packaged into appropriate formats for the different stakeholders such as planners,policy-makers and local communities.
 
3. Sectors and Biomes
Sectors
Biomes Inland Waters Biodiversity
 
4. Tools and Approaches
Tools and Approaches   Relevance
Score
  Further
Information
Public Participation 3-High
Management and Incentives 3-High
- Environmental accounting 3-High
Cross-sectoral Research and Working 3-High
 
5. Issues
Issues   Relevance
Score
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity 3-High
 
6. Ecosystem Approach
Principles and Operational Guidance   Relevance
Score
  Reason
(Only if NOT relevant)
Principle 1: The objectives of management of land, water and living resources are a matter of societal choices 3-High
Principle 2: Management should be decentralized to the lowest appropriate level 3-High
Principle 4: Recognizing potential gains from management, there is usually a need to understand and manage the ecosystem in an economic context 3-High
Principle 7: The ecosystem approach should be undertaken at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales 3-High
Principle 10: The ecosystem approach should seek the appropriate balance between, and integration of, conservation and use of biological diversity 1-Low
Principle 11: The ecosystem approach should consider all forms of relevant information, including scientific and indigenous and local knowledge, innovations and practices 3-High
Principle 12: The ecosystem approach should involve all relevant sectors of society and scientific disciplines 3-High
Operational Guidance A: Focus on the relationships and processes within ecosystem 3-High
Operational Guidance B: Enhance benefit-sharing 3-High
Operational Guidance D: Carry out management actions at the scale appropriate for the issue being addressed, with decentralization to lowest level, as appropriate 3-High
 
7. Lessons Learned and the Outcomes
Lessons Learned Conservation and sustainable use objectives cannot be achieved unless education,health,gender equity, transport and incomes and human well-being are first addressed. •Local-level economic resource valuation helped build awareness of the need for measures to ensure the sustainable use of the resource base. • Popular media (radio plays and songs)using local community artists were important for building awareness of wetland values and sustainable use. • Regional economic valuation of resources assisted in integrated transboundary planning within the basin. • To be more useful,the biodiversity study report needs to be packaged into appropriate formats for the different stakeholders such as planners,policy-makers and local communities.
Outcomes
Other Information
 
8. References
References Smith, R.D. & Maltby, E. (2003) Using the Ecosystem Approach to Implement the Convention on Biodiversity: Key issues and case studies. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK x + 118pp.
 
9. Contact Details
Contact Person Dr Diana Mortimer
Job Title Ecosystem Approach Officer
Organization Joint Nature Conservation Committee
Address Monkstone House, City Road,
Postal Code PE13 4LA
City Peterborough
ZIP/State/Province Cambs
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Telephone +44 1733 866857
Fax +44 1733 555948
E-mail Address diana.mortimer@jncc.gov.uk
 
 

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