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Burkina Faso - Country Profile

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Biodiversity Facts

Status and trends of biodiversity, including benefits from biodiversity and ecosystem services

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

Located in the heart of West Africa, Burkina Faso has a tropical climate with two distinct seasons: rainy and dry. Land classification in Burkina Faso falls into the following categories: forests, agricultural ecosystems, pastoral ecosystems, wetlands, urban areas, mountain ecosystems and conservation areas. These ecosystems host a large biodiversity, including 128 species of mammals, 516 species of birds, 60 species of reptile and amphibians, 121 fish species, 1,515 species of insects and 1,951 species of flora.

Burkina Faso possesses interesting sites such as the Pics de Sindou, the Karfiguela Waterfall, the Sacred Dafra Pond and Lake Tengréla. In addition, the Hippopotamus Pond and the Oursi Pond have been established as Ramsar sites.

Ecosystem services are extremely important as the country’s economy is essentially based on agriculture and breeding (85% of the population works in these fields). Severe and frequent droughts since the 1970s have also raised the importance of water management.

Main pressures on and drivers of change to biodiversity (direct and indirect)

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

The three main threats to biodiversity in Burkina Faso are increased rates of deforestation (4% per year according to the FAO), reduction in freshwater bodies and wetlands and decreased yields from agricultural systems. Drastic droughts, together with harmful human activities, have greatly contributed to the degradation of agricultural soils. Some of Burkina Faso’s threatened species include panthers, elephants, crocodiles and pythons.

Measures to Enhance Implementation of the Convention

Implementation of the NBSAP

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

The global objective of Burkina Faso’s NBSAP, adopted in 2001, was to ensure that populations manage biodiversity in a sustainable manner by 2025. The document emphasizes the need to motivate the population to preserve species and restore habitats, and manage natural resources in a dynamic and sustainable manner. Specific objectives were also established, such as: increasing agricultural, pastoral and timber production; protecting and restoring renewable natural resources; ensuring that the population’s needs are fulfilled (e.g. energy); and improving the quality of the environment. The objective of the Action Plan was to implement, in the pre-determined five-year period, realistic actions for the preservation and sustainable use of biodiversity by involving populations and giving them a sense of responsibility in regard to issues.

Burkina Faso is currently working on updating its NBSAP.

Actions taken to achieve the 2020 Aichi Biodiversity Targets

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

One of the central philosophies on the environment in Burkina Faso is that wealth and natural resources belong to the people and they should be used for improving living conditions. This belief is central to poverty alleviation through biological conservation.

Actions related to the following have been taken towards the achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and NBSAP implementation: rehabilitation and restoration programmes for pastoral areas; an increase in the number of forests, fauna and pastoral areas under some form of management; the creation of community-managed forest areas and collective pastures; increased community involvement in the management of biological resources; restoration programmes through afforestation initiatives; sub-regional initiatives against siltation; integrated management of water resources; and agricultural designs adapted to new climatic requirements and resistance to diseases.

Support mechanisms for national implementation (legislation, funding, capacity-building, coordination, mainstreaming, etc.)

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

Burkina Faso has put several important pieces of legislation in place (e.g. Environment Code, Forestry Code, Guidance Law on Water Management; Mining Code; Law on Pesticide Control; Health Code; General Code for Local Governments; Law on the National Strategy for Genetic Improvement).

There have also been various efforts to strengthen capacity. For example, the Programme for Capacity Management in Mining and Environment was established to improve environmental knowledge within the mining sector.

In Burkina Faso, efforts to integrate or mainstream sectoral and cross-sectoral biodiversity considerations have employed the same approach used in the development of the NBSAP.

Mechanisms for monitoring and reviewing implementation

The content of this biodiversity profile is still draft. The text below has been prepared by SCBD and remains subject to final approval by the Party concerned.

Responsibility for NBSAP monitoring and review should be undertaken at national, regional, provincial and departmental levels, although financial instruments still need to be put in place so that follow-up is possible.

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  • United Nations
  • United Nations Environment Programme