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News Headlines
#112946
2017-05-19

Assuming easy carbon removal from the atmosphere is a high-stakes gamble, scientists say

With the current pace of renewable energy deployment and emissions reductions efforts, the world is unlikely to achieve the Paris Climate Agreement's goal of limiting global warming to 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. This trend puts in doubt efforts to keep climate change damages from s ...

News Headlines
#112947
2017-05-19

India is spending 100 cr to save 4 critically endangered species

On World Biodiversity Day a look at what India is doing to save some of its most endangered species.India is one of the richest countries in terms of biodiversity, and hosts about 8% of all the documented species in the world, harbouring 4 of the 34 global biodiversity hotspots.

News Headlines
#112906
2017-05-18

As continents continue moving, study suggests effects on biodiversity

Continental drift and plate tectonics—the notion that large chunks of Earth's crust slowly but inexorably shift positions—was proposed in 1912 but not accepted until the 1960s. These movements changed the face of the planet—pieces of the continents congealed into the "supercontinent" Pangaea abo ...

News Headlines
#112907
2017-05-18

Go West Young Tree – Climate Change Moves Forests In Unexpected Direction

Climate change is shifting the forests of America in an unexpected direction. All over the world, global warming is causing ecosystems to move away from the equator or to higher altitudes, in search of favorable climatic conditions. However, in the eastern United States, even more tree species h ...

News Headlines
#112908
2017-05-18

It's time to take count of elephants in district forests

The elephant census, done once in five years, began in the district on Wednesday morning. Carried out by at least 84 environmentalists and volunteers, the data would be compiled and submitted to the wildlife warden in Chennai at the end of the four-day census on Saturday evening.

News Headlines
#112909
2017-05-18

Museum on biodiversity to open at QC parks center

The museum will feature six protected areas representing the different and unique terrestrial and marine ecosystems in the country.

News Headlines
#112910
2017-05-18

Pests and pathogens could cost agriculture billions: report

The spread of pests and pathogens that damage plant life could cost global agriculture $540 billion a year, according to a report published on Thursday.

News Headlines
#112911
2017-05-18

When civil engineering is inspired by nature

It is a course nature has taken by storm. Biomimicry -a term derived from 'bios' meaning life, and 'mimesis' meaning to imitate, is a relatively new science that explores designs and ideas inspired by nature to solve human problems.

News Headlines
#112912
2017-05-18

Treasure trove of new plant discoveries revealed

Many have potential as food crops, medicines or sources of timber.However, scientists say some of the newly-discovered plants are already at risk of extinction.

News Headlines
#112913
2017-05-18

A self-made billionaire is giving away his fortune to clean up the oceans

A Norwegian billionaire, who started out as a fisherman, has said he will give away most of his estimated $2.6 billion fortune in a bid to help clean up the world's oceans.

News Headlines
#112914
2017-05-18

EU to back developing nations fighting climate change with $890M US package

The European Union will provide 800 million euros ($891 million US) to help 79 African, Pacific and Caribbean nations implement a global deal to combat climate change.

News Headlines
#112915
2017-05-18

Climate change is likely bad news for wheat

Climate change will likely cause wheat and barley yields to decline by 17 to 33 percent by the end of the century, according to a new statistical model.

News Headlines
#112916
2017-05-18

As cicadas emerge four years early, scientists wonder if climate change is providing a nudge

Cicadas overwhelm tree branches across the mid-Atlantic once every 17 years, like clockwork. But something - some suspect climate change - could be sounding their alarm clocks four years early.

News Headlines
#112917
2017-05-18

Support pollination and plant a buzzworthy garden

With major backing brought about by brand name companies like Burt's Bees and Cheerios, and even policy proposals developed under past President Barack Obama's administration, collective pleas to protect pollinators have been propelled into the mainstream.

News Headlines
#112918
2017-05-18

East Africa: Tanzania Faces Decline in Wildlife Population - Report

Dar es Salaam — Tanzania faces a decline in wildlife population and environmental degradation due to population growth, environmental mismanagement and economic activities, a report indicates.

News Headlines
#112919
2017-05-18

Agony of Mother Earth (I) The Unstoppable Destruction of Forests

he world’s forests are being degraded and lost at a staggering rate of 3.3 million hectares per year. While their steady destruction in many Asian countries continues apace, deforestation of the world’s largest tropical forest – the Amazon – increased 29 per cent from last year’s numbers. And so ...

News Headlines
#112920
2017-05-18

Conservation Efforts To Improve Public Health

One fresh and inclusive way of examining human infectious diseases is through the lens of the wildlife and biodiversity they interface with. A group of scientists from UC Santa Barbara, Duke University and the University of Washington recently collaborated on assembling and editing various resea ...

News Headlines
#112921
2017-05-18

Lake Tanganyika is changing, and the fate of millions lie in the balance

Standing on the steep rocky shores of Lake Tanganyika at sunset, looking out at fishermen heading out for their nightly lamp-boat fishing trips, it's easy to imagine this immense 32,900km2 body of water as serene and unchanging.

News Headlines
#112922
2017-05-18

$19 million reserved for conservation of special-use forests in Ha Giang

The planning for conservation and development of special-use forest areas is expected to be the basis for the development of natural preservation and diversity in Ha Giang. As a northern mountainous province with forest coverage and land for forestry development accounting for over 71% of the pr ...

News Headlines
#112923
2017-05-18

Climate researchers must provide better visual communication on climate change

Climate researchers should give more consideration to ways in which they can make the message about climate change clear to the public at large. This is argued by Professor of Communication and Cognition Fons Maes in a publication in Nature. Although enormous amounts of visual and digital inform ...

News Headlines
#112924
2017-05-18

Which European countries are the most polluted?

New data from the World Health Organization shows Eastern European and Balkan countries suffer the highest rate of air contamination and air pollution-related deaths throughout Europe.

News Headlines
#112925
2017-05-18

Turkish delight: restoring Mediterranean marine life

Despite its relatively diminutive size, the Mediterranean may well be considered one of the world’s most pivotal bodies of water (its name literally translates as ‘sea in the middle of the world’). Yet marine conservation has not been a high priority for authorities overseeing human activities i ...

News Headlines
#112898
2017-05-17

Africa Calls for Funding to Restore Degraded Forests, Land

Investing in forest and landscape restoration as well as ensuring their sustainability will improve livelihoods of African people, experts have said. Speaking at a two-day Forest and Landscape Investment Forum in Kigali, yesterday, the experts called for investments to make green cover of more t ...

News Headlines
#112899
2017-05-17

Snail's DNA secrets unlocked in fight against river disease

Scientists have decoded the genome of a snail involved in the spread of a deadly parasitic disease. They say the information will help in the fight against schistosomiasis, an infection caused by a parasitic worm that lives in streams and ponds.

News Headlines
#112900
2017-05-17

Microalgae genes help them adapt to harsh oceans, other species less lucky

What do such mammoth wonders feed on? Little, semi-transparent crustaceans called krill. Lots and lots of krill. Measuring just six centimetres (around two and a half inches) and weighing about one gram fully grown, swarms of two million tonnes of krill spanning more than 450 square kilometres ( ...

News Headlines
#112901
2017-05-17

Climate Change May Be Taking a Toll on Your Mental Health

In the late hours of November 8th, as the deep-red electoral map made clear who would take the White House, a forest ecologist and friend of mine texted me in frustration about his work, “What’s the point?” You see, his research involves tree mortality.

News Headlines
#112902
2017-05-17

Corals that grow faster in warm water could beat climate change

Parts of the Great Barrier Reef and many other coral reefs around the world are already dying because of global warming. But if the fabulous ones in the northern Red Sea are protected from pollution, their unique evolutionary history means they might survive – and even thrive – late into this ce ...

News Headlines
#112903
2017-05-17

Trojan fish': Invasive rabbitfish spread invasive species

he mystery of how some invasive species may rapidly invade and spread in the world's oceans without assistance by marine traffic may have been partly solved by a new Mediterranean Sea study. Red Sea rabbitfish invaded the Mediterranean through the Suez Canal in the 20th century. Soon after, more ...

News Headlines
#112904
2017-05-17

South Africa: Study Finds That Climate Change Threatens Fynbos

A study using data stretching back several decades has produced the first empirical evidence that increasingly hot, dry summers driven by climate change are having a negative effect on the Cape's unique fynbos.

News Headlines
#112905
2017-05-17

Cities need to 'green up' to reduce impact of air pollution

The harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found.

News Headlines
#112875
2017-05-16

Embrace importance of biodiversity at Science Cafe Concord

Biodiversity might be an overused buzzword but it’s also a very good thing, and here’s why: It is ecology’s version of capitalism.Under that metaphor – which is an awesome metaphor, by the way – a place that lacks biodiversity is like the Soviet Union, where planners at the top eliminated compet ...

News Headlines
#112876
2017-05-16

Ongoing forest destruction has put Asia-Pacific at risk of missing global development targets – UN agency

The destruction of forests in many Asian countries continues apace, threatening the realization of global sustainable development goals by the 2030 deadline, according to the United Nations agricultural agency.

News Headlines
#112877
2017-05-16

Burning wood: Can the EU see the forest for the trees?

Somewhere in the swampy forests of the southeastern United States, a cypress tree is felled. Its lifelong work of absorbing and storing carbon is over. It will no longer hold the ground firm against erosion, or shelter endangered wading birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Instead, the tree is drive ...

News Headlines
#112878
2017-05-16

Drought in India: Conserving forests, effective use of floodplains can quell water shortage, says Prof Vikram Soni

India is facing the worst drought it has seen in the last 150 years, affecting the lives of millions of people across the subcontinent. Vikram Soni, professor emeritus at Jawaharlal Nehru University and Jamia Milia Islamia, came into prominence with his efforts to save the Delhi Ridge.

News Headlines
#112879
2017-05-16

Opinion: Fighting climate change and famine with forests in the Horn of Africa

Right now, 17 million people in the Horn of Africa are at risk of starvation. Massive crop failures, due to lack of rainfall, have led to a problem so dire that senior United Nations officials called this the worst humanitarian crisis they have faced. But they should have seen this coming: the r ...

News Headlines
#112880
2017-05-16

Changing crop patterns and climate change- how India’s agriculture continues to suffer

Crop patterns in India are changing without consideration for local agro-climatic conditions. This puts a burden on environment, incurring huge long-term losses.

News Headlines
#112881
2017-05-16

How agriculture neglect has led to food crisis

Since 2012, Kenya’s expenditure has been like that of a household that buys sufurias, gas cooker, micro-wave and refrigerator but forgets the most essential thing: food.

News Headlines
#112882
2017-05-16

Magnesium within plankton provides tool for taking the temperatures of past oceans

Scientists cannot travel into the past to take the Earth's temperature so they use proxies to discern past climates, and one of the most common methods for obtaining such data is derived from the remains of tiny marine organisms called foraminifera found in oceanic sediment cores.

News Headlines
#112883
2017-05-16

Code of conduct needed for ocean conservation, study says

A diverse group of the world's leading experts in marine conservation is calling for a Hippocratic Oath for ocean conservation ? not unlike the pledge physicians take to uphold specific ethical standards when practicing medicine.

News Headlines
#112884
2017-05-16

Toxic timebomb: why we must fight back against the world's plague of plastic

It’s everywhere. From the Mariana Trench to the floor of the Arctic Ocean, on tropical beaches and polar coasts. It’s in wildlife, seafood, sea salt and even on the surface of Mars. The world is blighted by plastic. Up to 12m tonnes of the stuff enters the world’s oceans every year (that’s one n ...

News Headlines
#112885
2017-05-16

Rare Mexican porpoise faces 'imminent extinction'

An immediate extension of a fishing ban is desperately needed to save the world's most endangered marine species. Campaigners say there are only 30 vaquita porpoises left, with their population having plummeted by 90% since 2011.

News Headlines
#112886
2017-05-16

The right to agricultural technology

In the 1960s, when biologist Paul Ehrlich was predicting mass starvation due to rapid population growth, plant breeder Norman Borlaug was developing the new crops and approaches to agriculture that would become mainstays of the Green Revolution. Those advances, along with other innovations in ag ...

News Headlines
#112887
2017-05-16

Protecting endangered species: 6 essential reads

The Endangered Species Act, passed in 1973, created a framework for protecting and recovering species in peril and the ecosystems on which they depend. Critics in Congress are pressing to rewrite the law, which they argue limits development and has failed to help many species recover. For Endang ...

News Headlines
#112888
2017-05-16

Ancient ice stored in Alberta offers new information on climate change: study

Researchers studying ancient ice from Canada’s Arctic say the samples reveal new information on what climate change could do. The ice cores were drilled to a depth of more than a kilometre on Ellesmere Island in Nunavut and were saved by an Alberta university when the program that preserved them ...

News Headlines
#112889
2017-05-16

What can lost underwater lands tell us about climate change?

Underwater lands that were submerged following the last Ice Age could yield vital clues about our current approach to climate change. Global experts in archaeology, climate change, history and oceanography are discussing how we can unlock these secrets at a prestigious Royal Society meeting on 1 ...

News Headlines
#112890
2017-05-16

Giant hands emerge from canal to address climate change

To raise awareness about the impact of climate change Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn unveiled an enormous sculpture on Saturday at the Ca' Sagredo Hotel in Venice.

News Headlines
#112891
2017-05-16

Climate change: Extreme rainfall will vary between regions

If global average temperatures rise by 4 degrees Celsius over the next hundred years, as many climate models predict given relatively high CO2 emissions, much of North America and Europe would experience increases in the intensity of extreme rainfall of roughly 25 percent.

News Headlines
#112892
2017-05-16

Climate change will cut cereal yields, model predicts—technological advances could offset those losses

Climate change will likely cause wheat and barley yields to decline by 17 to 33 percent by the end of the century, predicts a new statistical model developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Cornell University.

News Headlines
#112893
2017-05-16

Songbirds are being trolled by climate change

For a migratory bird, springtime in the northern hemisphere means bugs, and babies. In the first few warm days of the year North American insects emerge by the millions, to eat young leaves before trees begin to infuse them with an insect deterrent. And songbirds, who were wintering in South and ...

News Headlines
#112894
2017-05-16

Data drive to help farmers cope with climate change via their smartphones

As smartphones spread to rural areas, an initiative backed by tech giants aims to help small farmers in poor countries access data on crops, weather and soil, helping them boost production in the face of climate change, a farming group said on Monday.

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