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News Headlines
#135311
2022-07-12

IPBES Values Assessment: integrating indigenous and local knowledge with scientific knowledge leads to more just and sustainable social and ecological outcomes

The assessment unveils important findings. It reveals that decision-making processes that support representation and consideration of diverse values and integrate indigenous and local knowledge with scientific knowledge have more just and sustainable social and ecological outcomes.

News Headlines
#135312
2022-07-12

Bumblebees kept in isolation make up for it by being more social later

A new study shows that social isolation changes the behavior and brain development of bumblebees, but not in the way researchers expected.

News Headlines
#135313
2022-07-12

Rich nations caused climate harm to poorer ones, study says

In calculations designed to help nations hurt by climate change get compensation for decades of carbon pollution from rich, high-emitting nations, researchers have calculated just how much losses and benefits each country has caused to others.

News Headlines
#135314
2022-07-12

Crew aboard private yacht confirm sighting of bioluminescent 'milky sea'

An atmospheric scientist with Colorado State University has gained confirmation of his discovery of a bioluminescent "milky sea" event through testimony of a crew aboard a private yacht.

News Headlines
#135315
2022-07-12

Scientists identify mechanism responsible for fruit and seed development in flowering plants

With rising global temperatures and dwindling pollinator populations, food production has become increasingly difficult for the world's growers.

News Headlines
#135316
2022-07-12

How stressed-out plants produce their own aspirin

Plants protect themselves from environmental hazards like insects, drought and heat by producing salicylic acid, also known as aspirin. A new understanding of this process may help plants survive increasing stress caused by climate change.

News Headlines
#135317
2022-07-12

First major dolphin DNA study

The first widespread census of the genetic diversity of common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) populations living along 3000km of Australia's southern coastline has raised key pointers for future conservation efforts.

News Headlines
#135318
2022-07-12

Climate change exacerbates violence against women and girls

It is estimated that 80 per cent of people displaced by climate change are women, according to UN Environment. When women are displaced, they are at greater risk of violence, including sexual violence, said Michele Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

News Headlines
#135319
2022-07-12

Final destination deep sea: Microplastics' impact on ocean floor even greater than assumed

Senckenberg researchers Serena Abel and Angelika Brandt, together with colleagues from the Alfred Wegener Institute—Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and Goethe University in Frankfurt, have investigated microplastic pollution in the Western Pacific Kuril-Kamchatka Trench.

News Headlines
#135320
2022-07-12

The pace of the transition to an environmentally sustainable economy

In watching the reaction of advocates and experts to the Supreme Court's decision in EPA v. West Virginia, I was struck by their dismay that the EPA would no longer be able to implement rapid sweeping change in the nation's energy system.

News Headlines
#135321
2022-07-12

Rare deep-sea brine pools discovered in Red Sea

Researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science recently discovered rare deep-sea brine pools in the Gulf of Aqaba, a northern extension to the Red Sea.

News Headlines
#135323
2022-07-12

Africa is a treasure trove of medicinal plants: here are seven that are popular

Plants have directly contributed to the development of important drugs. The antimalarial treatment artemisinin, pain medication morphine, and cancer chemotherapy taxol are just three examples of drugs derived from plants.

News Headlines
#135322
2022-07-12

Scientists suggest naming heatwaves as part of early warning system to save lives

The U.K. should name heatwaves as part of an effective early warning system to protect the most vulnerable, says leading U.K. scientists.

News Headlines
#135325
2022-07-12

Minister Guilbeault pleads for a global agreement on biodiversity

Environment and Climate Change Minister Steven Guilbeault. The Federal Minister of the Environment has completed a two-day tour of Washington during which he hammered home the need for a global agreement to halt the “alarming rate” of biodiversity loss .

News Headlines
#135261
2022-07-11

Illegal Trade in Wild Species Could Be $199 Billion Market: Report

Main article: Blinded by greed, human beings have literally dug their graves as their indiscriminate consumption gravely impacted the natural ecosystem over the years.

News Headlines
#135262
2022-07-11

GDP and market metrics selling nature and climate change short, warn scientists

The focus of the report by IPBES - the body that covers biodiversity as the IPCC does climate change - is to highlight the vast array of ways in which different people value nature

News Headlines
#135263
2022-07-11

Biodiversity science–policy panel calls for broadening value-of-nature concepts in sustainable development

The Intergovernmental Science–Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) approved the Summary for Policy Makers of the Assessment Report on the Diverse Values and Valuation of Nature on 9 July 2022 in its ninth plenary meeting in Bonn, Germany.

News Headlines
#135264
2022-07-11

Global economic policy overlooks huge value of nature, UN experts warn

IPBES research calls for science-based valuation of nature to be placed at the heart of economic decision-making in order to reverse the biodiversity crisis

News Headlines
#135265
2022-07-11

15 Issues That Could Greatly Impact Marine and Coastal Biodiversity

Researchers have listed fifteen areas of concern, emphasizing the need to tackle these issues. Examples include the mining of lithium from the deep sea, exploitation of species found in deeper waters, and the unforeseen effects of wildfires across different ecosystems.

News Headlines
#135266
2022-07-11

Seal of approval? Rescue services warn approaching Australian marine wildlife can be fraught

If you ever stumble upon a seal pup far from home, best leave it alone and call for help. Humans (and their dogs) can pose a danger to seals, and the marine mammals can give humans tuberculosis.

News Headlines
#135267
2022-07-11

Biodiversity: Wild species can help feed the world

Biodiversity experts are calling for the preservation of often endangered wild species, which could provide food and income for billions worldwide.

News Headlines
#135268
2022-07-11

What the SCOTUS ruling on EPA and emissions means for climate change

On June 30, the U.S. Supreme Court delivered its ruling on West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limiting the EPA's authority under a provision of the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector.

News Headlines
#135269
2022-07-11

WHO Examines the Effects of Climate Change on Mental Health

Last month, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched a policy report to confront the increasingly strong and lasting impacts that climate change is having directly and indirectly on people's mental health and psychosocial well-being.

News Headlines
#135270
2022-07-11

Can you pay an elephant to fight climate change?

Countries and businesses pay billions of dollars to offset their carbon dioxide emissions, transferring money to projects like forest or wetland restoration. But these markets have generally ignored wildlife, which are often critically important to the growth of their ecosystems.

News Headlines
#135271
2022-07-11

The EPA needs to retool its fight against climate pollution. Here’s how.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that the EPA did not have the authority under the Clean Air Act to decide which energy sources would be prioritized. Essentially, this means that EPA cannot curb carbon emission through “generation shifting.”

News Headlines
#135273
2022-07-11

How climate change is making extreme weather a regular occurrence

Torrential rains in Japan, record-breaking heatwaves in Europe, and recurring droughts in the western US. For the second year in a row the start of summer in the northern hemisphere has been marked by extreme weather. To what extent is global warming to blame?

News Headlines
#135274
2022-07-11

Colorful new corals bedeck the busy waters off Hong Kong, study shows

In the eastern waters off Hong Kong, a group of scientists searching for coral-eating nudibranchs stumbled upon a colorful surprise: three new species of sun corals. These orange, purple and green corals belong to the genus Tubastraea, bringing the known members of this coral group from seven sp ...

News Headlines
#135275
2022-07-11

Natural regeneration and women-led initiatives help drive Atlantic Forest Pact

When she was 6 years old, Ludmila Pugliese de Siqueira moved with her family to the state of Amazonas in northeastern Brazil. Her father was a geologist and worked on the construction of the Balbina Dam in the 1980s.

News Headlines
#135276
2022-07-11

Evidence of stronger overturning circulation in the Pacific during the last glacial period

Located between Australia and New Zealand, the Tasman Sea is an important but so far neglected component of the global ocean conveyor belt.

News Headlines
#135277
2022-07-11

Austria and Hungary fight nature to stop lake vanishing

Kitesurfers and windsurfers dot picturesque Lake Neusiedl on the Austrian-Hungarian border –- but the water is so low some get stuck in the mud.

News Headlines
#135278
2022-07-11

Nanocellulose may help wild blueberry yield when applied with fertilizer, study finds

Nanocellulose may help increase the yield from wild blueberry plants when used with liquid fertilizer applied to leaves, according to a new University of Maine study.

News Headlines
#135279
2022-07-11

Education system 'neglecting the importance of plants,' say researchers

People are becoming "disconnected from the botanical world" at a time when plants could help solve global environmental problems, warn a group of research scientists.

News Headlines
#135280
2022-07-11

Global warming may not be as bad for animal reproduction as thought, study suggests

Animals are more likely to mate in warmer environments, a study analyzing the impact of climate change on reproductive behavior has found.

News Headlines
#135281
2022-07-11

Root-farming gophers might be our closest agricultural relatives

Although you'll probably never see them, you can spot them by the tell-tale mounds of sandy soil dotting a field: pocket gophers. Beneath your feet, the gophers continuously create and remold a labyrinth of winding tunnels hundreds of feet long.

News Headlines
#135282
2022-07-11

Scientists uncover the 'romantic journey' of plant reproduction

Researchers in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology (PMB) have uncovered the intricate molecular processes that precede reproduction in flowering plants.

News Headlines
#135283
2022-07-11

Ancestral genetic variation essential for rapid evolution of Darwin's finches

In a study, published in Science Advances, an international team of researchers have identified 28 gene regions that have been particularly important in the evolution of Darwin's finches.

News Headlines
#135284
2022-07-11

Study provides novel evolutionary insights into unisexual reproductive success

Unisexual reproduction lacks meiotic recombination, resulting in the accumulation of deleterious mutations and hindering the creation of genetic diversity. Thus, unisexual taxa are commonly considered an evolutionary dead end.

News Headlines
#135285
2022-07-11

Biogeographical patterns of bacterial communities and their antibiotic resistomes in inland waters of Southeast China

A recent study by scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences uncovered the distinct biogeographical patterns of bacterial communities and ARG (antibiotic resistance genes) profiles in inland waters of southeast China under low-anthropogenic impact at a large scale.

News Headlines
#135286
2022-07-11

Examining the complex family relationships of ancient gobies

An international team of researchers led by LMU paleontologist Bettina Reichenbacher has managed to classify fossils of one of the most species-rich fish groups into a family tree for the first time.

News Headlines
#135287
2022-07-11

Rebound for bird on brink of extinction

A recent survey in northern Victoria uncovered a record number of plains wanderers—small, quail-like birds that live only in eastern Australia grasslands, and represent an ancient lineage of birds that evolved in Gondwana more than 100 million years ago.

News Headlines
#135288
2022-07-11

Weather extremes to change future farming

The agricultural sector will increasingly need to adopt new technologies and entrepreneurial flair, along with more flexible land use, to provide secondary income and to combat weather extremes such as floods and drought, according to new research.

News Headlines
#135289
2022-07-11

Why is it so hot in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and what are the dangers?

The UK and continental Europe are sweltering in a heatwave due to last until at least the weekend, and the climate crisis is playing a clear role in intensifying extreme temperatures.

News Headlines
#135290
2022-07-11

Firefighters attempt to save giant sequoias as Yosemite wildfire grows

A grove containing some of the world’s oldest giant sequoia trees is under threat from a rapidly growing wildfire at California’s Yosemite national park.

News Headlines
#135291
2022-07-11

What’s worse for the planet than millions of vans delivering shopping? Millions of vans delivering air

Technically, it has been around since bananas came with skin and coconuts with shells. More recently, it has become less good, though.

News Headlines
#135260
2022-07-06

Nature-based solutions: How can they work for climate, biodiversity and people?

Experts gathered in Oxford this month to discuss how “nature-based solutions” can be used to tackle the twin threats of climate change and biodiversity loss.

News Headlines
#135233
2022-07-06

Global dismay as supreme court ruling leaves Biden’s climate policy in tatters

Joe Biden’s election triggered a global surge in optimism that the climate crisis would, finally, be decisively confronted. But the US supreme court’s decision last week to curtail America’s ability to cut planet-heating emissions has proved the latest blow to a faltering effort by Biden on clim ...

News Headlines
#135234
2022-07-06

First Nations' ancient fish bones may help us adapt to climate change

The study of 5,000-year-old fish bones on the West Coast is revealing how Indigenous people adapted to warming oceans — information that could shape present day adaptations and fisheries management as the climate crisis advances, University of Victoria researchers say.

News Headlines
#135235
2022-07-06

Rubber used by leading European tire makers linked to forest loss in Africa: Report

Top European tire makers, including France’s Michelin and Germany’s Continental AG, are sourcing rubber from agribusinesses implicated in deforestation and undermining land rights in western and central Africa, a report by the non-profit Global Witness found.

News Headlines
#135236
2022-07-06

Traditional communities rally behind ecotourism to conserve their forests

When she was a child, Cruz Ávila used to walk through the forest as part of her daily routine. She would pick wood or medicinal plants. She learned to find birds hidden in the branches and to identify the different trees. She also found that walking among the pines and listening to a waterfall i ...

News Headlines
#135237
2022-07-06

Can scientists predict when the next exceptional high tide will occur along the St. Lawrence River?

Residents of eastern Québec probably remember the exceptional weather conditions and the very high tide of Dec. 6, 2010. The combination caused flooding along the shores of the St. Lawrence River and millions of dollars in damage to public and private infrastructure.

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