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News Headlines
#114230
2017-08-29

A bed & breakfast in L.A. reveals the lifestyle of a secretive fly species

For nearly 30 years, Dr. Brian Brown knew about a mysterious unidentified phorid fly species, whose females would often be spotted flying above mushrooms, while the males were nowhere to be found.

News Headlines
#114233
2017-08-29

Is hearing loss in farmed fish a price worth paying for aquaculture’s meteoric rise?

A study finds that accelerated growing conditions on some fish farms are causing hearing impairments in salmon. It’s a reminder that aquaculture’s own accelerated rise needs to be closely managed

News Headlines
#114199
2017-08-28

Oil and water may mix under extreme pressure

They say that oil and water do not mix … but now scientists have discovered that – under certain circumstances – it may be possible.

News Headlines
#114206
2017-08-28

Medicine’s Newest Biomimicry Inspirations: Spider-Man and the Slippery Slug

Biomimicry is increasingly becoming the go-to resource for solving technology’s biggest problems. From the gecko’s sticky webbed feet to the kingfisher’s needle-shaped beak, Mother Nature’s resources seem inexhaustible.

News Headlines
#114207
2017-08-28

How modern technology is inspired by the natural world

What do a kingfisher, cocklebur pods and a Namibian beetle have in common? Besides being living organisms, they have all served as inspiration for creative human technologies to solve challenging problems.

News Headlines
#114162
2017-08-23

How continents were recycled

Plate tectonics shape the Earth's dynamic surface. But when did these dynamics first emerge? And will the present-day continents last forever?

News Headlines
#114164
2017-08-23

Toothless, dwarf dolphin, a case study in evolution

Scientists on Wednesday unveiled an extinct species of toothless, whiskered and objectively cute mini-dolphin that plied Earth's oceans some 30 million years ago.

News Headlines
#114168
2017-08-23

Countries in Europe with the richest biodiversity do not always receive more funding

A recent study, published in the journal Conservation Biology, reveals that the investments and resources allotted for conservation only partially tally with the levels of biodiversity in the European Union. Thus, countries such as Portugal, Slovakia, Greece and the Czech Republic receive less f ...

News Headlines
#114145
2017-08-22

New study calls for better information on changes in wild animal populations

Key statistics about the world's animal and plant life could present a misleading picture about the natural world according to new research from the University of St Andrews.

News Headlines
#114134
2017-08-18

Measuring global biodiversity change

A new article shows how Essential Biodiversity Variables can be produced to measure biodiversity change at a global scale.

News Headlines
#114028
2017-08-09

Genomic database will aid scientists studying the impact of global challenge across life on Earth

A new publicly available database will catalog metadata associated with biologic samples, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses. The resource, called the Genomic Observatories Metadatabase (GeOMe), was developed by researchers ...

News Headlines
#113992
2017-08-04

Scientists link biodiversity genomics with museum wisdom through new public database

A new publicly available database will catalog metadata associated with biologic samples, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses. It links publicly available genetic data to records of where and when samples were collected. Such ...

News Headlines
#113981
2017-08-02

Are Studies That Evaluate Ecosystem Services Useful?

Ecologists find flaws in the approach to research that focuses on services ecosystems provide to humans. These flaws limit certain studies’ utility.

News Headlines
#113953
2017-07-28

'Omnipresent' effects of human impact on England's landscape revealed

Concrete structures forming a new, human-made rock type; ash particles in the landscape; and plastic debris are just a few of the new materials irreversibly changing England's landscape and providing evidence of the effects of the Anthropocene, the research suggests.

News Headlines
#113928
2017-07-27

Visionary project to save the Belize coast provides valuable framework

A coastal zone management plan designed to safeguard Belize's natural assets has produced a win-win opportunity for people and the environment, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where overfishing, development, and habitat degradation are increasingly serio ...

News Headlines
#113937
2017-07-27

New ecological model uses tournament-style framework of biodiversity

A new mathematical model of ecology created by University of Chicago scientists provides the most accurate reproduction to date of natural biodiversity, according to a new paper in the journal Nature.

News Headlines
#113938
2017-07-27

Scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropics

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has recently completed a global study on the trade-offs between the benefits provided by tropical forests and its conversion for agricultural use. The team examined deforestation activities of more than 50 countries in the tro ...

News Headlines
#113913
2017-07-26

Conductivity key to mapping water inside Earth

Hydrogen at elevated temperature creates high electrical conductivity in the Earth's mantle.New work by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists shows the dispersal of water (incorporated as hydrogen in olivine, the most abundant mineral in the upper mantle), could account for hi ...

News Headlines
#113901
2017-07-24

High risk of 'unprecedented' winter downpours - Met Office

There's an increased risk of "unprecedented" winter downpours such as those that caused extensive flooding in 2014, the UK Met Office says. Their study suggests there's now a one in three chance of monthly rainfall records being broken in England and Wales in winter.

News Headlines
#113840
2017-07-20

Researchers combining data and technology to make agriculture more sustainable

Due to the large usage of water in agriculture, many California communities no longer have running water, and collapsing aquifers have caused roads and buildings to sink several feet. Purdue University electrical and computer engineering professor David Ebert is using data collected from agricul ...

News Headlines
#113846
2017-07-20

New study explains moss migration around the globe

A new study on mosses found in the polar regions reveals how several species have migrated around the globe and are even found in their polar opposite.

News Headlines
#113824
2017-07-19

Beavers' biodiversity benefits highlighted in new study

A new study has highlighted beavers "exceptional" ability to rebuild diverse wetlands. Scientists from Stirling University looked at the effects a group of beavers had on a wetland in Tayside originally drained for farming.

News Headlines
#113828
2017-07-19

Satellite Snafu Masked True Sea Level Rise for Decades

The numbers didn’t add up. Even as Earth grew warmer and glaciers and ice sheets thawed, decades of satellite data seemed to show that the rate of sea-level rise was holding steady—or even declining.

News Headlines
#113809
2017-07-18

New analysis identifies hotspots for water conflict worldwide

A new analysis has projected that risks for water conflict will increase over the next 15 to 30 years in four hotspot regions, namely the Middle East, Central Asia, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna basin, and the Orange and Limpopo basins in southern Africa.

News Headlines
#113811
2017-07-18

Key to speeding up carbon sequestration discovered

Scientists at Caltech and USC have discovered a way to speed up the slow part of the chemical reaction that ultimately helps the earth to safely lock away, or sequester, carbon dioxide into the ocean. Simply adding a common enzyme to the mix, the researchers have found, can make that rate-limiti ...

News Headlines
#113799
2017-07-17

Refined DNA tool tracks native and invasive fish

Rather than conduct an aquatic roll call with nets to know which fish reside in a particular body of water, scientists can now use DNA fragments suspended in water to catalog invasive or native species.

News Headlines
#113801
2017-07-17

Acidifying Oceans Favor Sea Vermin

Scientists predict that in the next twenty years, the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in our atmosphere will rise from the roughly 404 ppm it is now to over 450 ppm—and as a result, ecosystems worldwide will change. Many impacts will be particularly felt in our planet’s oceans. As atmospheric CO2 ...

News Headlines
#113806
2017-07-17

Why Tyrannosaurus was a slow runner

A research team under the direction of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have now described why the largest animals are not the fastest. They have managed to so thanks to an amazingly simple mathematical model. The only info ...

News Headlines
#113775
2017-07-14

Research as Art Awards 2017: Fifteen extraordinary images shed light on the beauty and diversity of research

Fifteen stunning images, and the fascinating stories behind them—such as how a barn owl's pellets reveal which animals it has eaten, how data can save lives, and how Barbie breaks free—have today been revealed as the winners of the 2017 Research as Art awards.

News Headlines
#113750
2017-07-13

How to cryopreserve fish embryos and bring them back to life (video)

Scientists report for the first time the ability to both deep freeze and reanimate zebrafish embryos. The method, appearing in the journal ACS Nano, could potentially be used to bank larger aquatic and other vertebrate oocytes and embryos, too, for a life in the future.

News Headlines
#113751
2017-07-13

Chillier winters, smaller beaks

Although Charles Darwin lived and worked in the 19th century, modern evolutionary biologists are far from exhausting all avenues of inquiry regarding birds and evolution. For example, in the 1990s, researchers such as Russ Greenberg, ornithologist from the Smithsonian Institution in the United S ...

News Headlines
#113735
2017-07-12

Modeling Ocean Waves over Rocky Reefs

For many beachgoers, the cyclical nature of gently rolling and crashing waves is a soothing sight. But to oceanographers (and perhaps some surfers), the behavior of ocean waves is a complex physics problem to be deciphered.

News Headlines
#113723
2017-07-11

Why mosquitoes should not be eliminated

A Purdue researcher and a team of scientists working on a new insecticide argue that mosquitoes should not simply be made extinct due to their role in various ecosystems.

News Headlines
#113726
2017-07-11

Earth already in midst of sixth mass extinction, scientists say – video report

The scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has reported that the Earth is already in the stages of the sixth mass extinction, which will see the world’s wildlife and plants die out.

News Headlines
#113679
2017-07-07

Fern fossil data clarifies origination and extinction of species

Throughout the history of life, new groups of species have flourished at the expense of earlier ones and global biodiversity has varied dramatically over geologic time. A new study led by the University of Turku, Finland, shows that completely different factors regulate the rise and fall of species.

News Headlines
#113667
2017-07-06

Making a Better Leaf

As the world casts about for greener, cleaner technologies to allow future sustainable development, scientists are increasingly turning to the very thing we’re trying to save—nature—for ideas. Biomimicry, as this nature-inspired technologies are called, seeks to capitalize on the products of unt ...

News Headlines
#113602
2017-07-05

Bacteria collaborate to propel the ocean 'engine'

Essential microbiological interactions that keep our oceans stable have been fully revealed for the first time, by researchers at the University of Warwick.

News Headlines
#113605
2017-07-05

Scientists Discover Plastic-Eating Marine Fungus

Researchers from the University of Aveiro, Portugal, have discovered a form of marine fungus that degrades plastic, meaning it can potentially be used to combat pollution.

News Headlines
#113549
2017-06-30

High-tech sensors to gather long-term biogeochemical data

The crew of the Royal Research Ship Discovery, a scientific research vessel of the United Kingdom, recently deployed high-technology biogeochemical sensors onto existing 'Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program' (OSNAP) moorings in the Rockall Trough, a major deep-water area in the No ...

News Headlines
#113554
2017-06-30

Climate change sceptics suffer blow as satellite data correction shows 140% faster global warming

New research 'substantially undermines' claims that satellite data proved the Earth was not warming as quickly as thought, Dr Zeke Hausfather says

News Headlines
#113559
2017-06-30

Andean orchids – not so ancient

The Andes are the world's most species rich biological diversity hotspot, containing an astounding 15% of the world's plant species, despite making up only 1% of the earth's surface. Orchids are a key element of Andean plant life, but despite their importance and abundance, particularly epiphyti ...

News Headlines
#113531
2017-06-29

Coral exposed to radioactivity from nuclear bomb could hold key to a cure for cancer

Coral exposed to radioactivity from nuclear bomb testing could hold the key to a cure for cancer, according to new research. The marine invertebrate at the bottom of the ocean floor has remarkable resistance to radiation exposure, say scientists.

News Headlines
#113492
2017-06-28

Protecting pandas may save the planet: study

Efforts to safeguard pandas not only benefit the beloved bears, but can also help protect other species, boost biodiversity and fight climate change, a study has found.

News Headlines
#113502
2017-06-28

Feature: Study of caterpillars shows how creepy-crawlies could help shape robots in future

A young academic won a major award from the prestigious Zoological Society of London (ZSL) on Tuesday for his devotion to studying the lives of "creepy crawlies."

News Headlines
#113505
2017-06-28

Reptile skin grown in lab for the first time

Scientists recently reconstructed the skin of endangered green turtles, marking the first time that skin of a non-mammal was successfully engineered in a laboratory, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey study.

News Headlines
#113471
2017-06-23

Canada's tree-mendous discovery: Forests limit harmful ozone gas

It was a Tuesday in early February 2015 when Sylvie Gravel walked into her colleague Paul Makar’s office carrying printouts that would mystify both of them. The two scientists at Environment and Climate Change Canada were staring at computer model forecasts of ozone gas. Up in the Earth’s atmosp ...

News Headlines
#113479
2017-06-23

Bird eggs are shaped depending on the birds’ flight behavior

A new study published Thursday in the journal Science explains why bird eggs come in different shapes and sizes. It says that this happens because eggs are shaped according to the birds’ flight behavior.

News Headlines
#113480
2017-06-23

Watched chimps change their hunting habits

Chimpanzees in Uganda may have changed their hunting strategy in response to being watched by scientists. While studying the animals, researchers documented very different hunting habits of two closely neighbouring chimp "tribes".

News Headlines
#113456
2017-06-22

Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occur

Today Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature ecology & evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University.

News Headlines
#113413
2017-06-21

Researchers discover new species of crab within the Qatar Marine Zone

A team at Qatar University has discovered a new species of crab during an exploration trip on the research vessel Janan. The trip aimed to investigate marine benthic biodiversity within the Qatar Marine Zone.

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