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News Headlines
#116187
2018-03-06

Without 46 million year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armor

You've probably heard about poop pills, the latest way for humans to get benevolent bacteria into their guts. But it seems that a group of ants may have been the original poop pill pioneers—46 million years ago.

News Headlines
#116148
2018-03-01

Disappearing act

The Asian tiger mosquito -- carrier of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya and Zika -- appears to have vanished from Palmyra. Not native to the small atoll 1,000 miles south of Hawaii, Aedes albopict likely came to Palmyra during World War II, when the United St ...

News Headlines
#116149
2018-03-01

Conservation goals may fall short without protection of intact forests: study

The few remaining intact forests that are free from damaging human activities need special protection to meet conservation and climate goals, scientists said in a new study.

News Headlines
#116155
2018-03-01

Researchers study flower that catapults pollen

Flowers are just about the last thing in nature you'd list as fast, but the mountain laurels' filaments are an exception.The defining characteristic of the flowers, which are native to the eastern United States, is a series of 10 arms or filaments that act like catapults, flinging pollen into th ...

News Headlines
#116127
2018-02-28

New research illustrates how birds help to produce rare wild chili peppers

f you've enjoyed some spicy food lately, you might have a bird to thank.A new study involving Iowa State University researchers explores how a mutualistic, or mutually beneficial, relationship between birds and chili peppers in the Mariana Islands helps chili peppers grow in the wild. The study, ...

News Headlines
#116135
2018-02-28

Study suggests active restoration of damaged ecosystems not always better than nature

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests human efforts to restore damaged ecosystems are not always better than simply letting nature take its course. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes analyzing over 400 studies docum ...

News Headlines
#116136
2018-02-28

How algae change their internal solar panels to stay alive

A collaboration between the Benning and Kramer labs is revealing how nature's solar panels, found inside algae, constantly grow and shrink in size to adjust to changes in their environments, a crucial system that ensures their hosts stay healthy and alive.

News Headlines
#116118
2018-02-27

5.5 million-year-old fossil turtle species sheds light on invasive modern relatives

A University of Pennsylvania paleontologist has described a 5.5 million-year-old fossil species of turtle from eastern Tennessee. It represents a new species of the genus Trachemys, commonly known as sliders, which are frequently kept as pets today.

News Headlines
#116097
2018-02-26

More precise measurements show West Antarctica ice melt accelerating

A team of researchers from NASA and several other institutions in the U.S. and Europe has found evidence of ice melt accelerating in some western parts of Antarctica. In their paper published in the journal Cryosphere, the group describes the new technology they used to study ice melt in Antarct ...

News Headlines
#116085
2018-02-22

Researchers optimise broad beans for bees

Scientists from Royal Holloway, University of London and the University of Cambridge have been taking part in an experiment to optimise broad beans to increase bee visitation rates; and their findings could benefit both the beans and the bees.

News Headlines
#116086
2018-02-22

Asian elephants have different personality traits just like humans

Researchers of the University of Turku, Finland, have studied a timber elephant population in Myanmar and discovered that Asian elephant personality manifests through three factors. The personality factors identified by the researchers are attentiveness, sociability and aggressiveness.

News Headlines
#116055
2018-02-21

Conflicts between male and female can take place in the development of new species

Male and female of same species can develop to be different to the point that they keep different species from advancing or colonizing living spaces. The study also challenges long-held hypotheses in transit normal choice drives the advancement of biodiversity.

News Headlines
#116058
2018-02-21

Green toads with multiple genomes have ancestors that are only distantly related

Diploid vertebrates have two sets of chromosomes, one from each parent. In contrast, polyploidy, meaning to possess three or more sets of chromosomes, is very rare in animals. To find out how new vertebrate species have evolved, and, more generally, how the current biodiversity emerged, evolutio ...

News Headlines
#116059
2018-02-21

Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds—just a myth?

How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters—however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.

News Headlines
#116068
2018-02-21

Tasmanian tiger 'joeys' revealed in 3D

It is a fascinating insight into the biology of an extinct animal. Scientists have scanned all known preserved Tasmanian tiger "joeys" to better understand the marsupial's key early development phases.

News Headlines
#116071
2018-02-21

A global view of species diversity in high elevations, via mountain birds

A new look at mountain birds is helping Yale University researchers test long-held assumptions about species richness in high elevations.

News Headlines
#116031
2018-02-20

Scientists Complete Butterfly Evolutionary Tree

An international team of lepidopterists has compiled the most comprehensive evolutionary tree for butterflies to date. The results appear in the journal Current Biology.

News Headlines
#116040
2018-02-20

Origins of land plants pushed back in time

A seminal event in the Earth's history - when plants appeared on land - may have happened 100 million years earlier than previously thought. Land plants evolved from "pond scum" about 500 million years ago, according to new research.

News Headlines
#116042
2018-02-20

Cracking the genetic code for complex traits in cattle

A massive global study involving 58,000 cattle has pinpointed the genes that influence the complex genetic trait of height in cattle, opening the door for researchers to use the same approach to map high-value traits including those important for beef and milk production.

News Headlines
#116049
2018-02-20

Research finds evolutionary ‘secret sauce’ against climate change

Research suggests hares and jackrabbits hopping along in the Rocky Mountains demonstrate the “secret sauce” for how animals can adapt to a new climate. (Wikimedia commons)

News Headlines
#116022
2018-02-19

A switch to plant-based protein could help tackle climate change and hunger

Agriculture – both victim and cause of climate change. New research shows moving away from animal protein towards legumes makes sense nutritionally and environmentally.

News Headlines
#116026
2018-02-19

The 11th species of an endemic Australian wasp genus

As well as an interest in all insects, Flinders biological sciences Ph.D. Ben Parslow has a fascination for wasps.The focus of his doctorate research on the wasp genus Gasteruption has accidently has put him on the trail of describing the 11th species of an endemic Australian wasp genus.

News Headlines
#116029
2018-02-19

Biodiversity loss raises risk of 'extinction cascades'

New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of "extinction cascades," where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions.

News Headlines
#116006
2018-02-16

Plants are given a new family tree

A new genealogy of plant evolution, led by researchers at the University of Bristol, shows that the first plants to conquer land were a complex species, challenging long-held assumptions about plant evolution.

News Headlines
#116007
2018-02-16

Starfish can see in the dark (among other amazing abilities)

If you go down to the shore today, you're sure of a big surprise. Many will have witnessed the presence of a starfish or two when visiting the seashore or a public aquarium. Starfish come in an exciting range of colours and sizes, but have you ever given a thought to how this multi-armed wonder ...

News Headlines
#116008
2018-02-16

Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity

It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta beans? A new study by WCS, Princeton University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison appearing in the journal Scientific Reports has taken the questi ...

News Headlines
#115978
2018-02-15

Rapid evolution of a calcareous microalgae

When simulating future environmental conditions, researchers confront a problem: Laboratory experiments are easy to control and to reproduce, but are insufficient to mimic the complexity of natural ecosystems. In contrast, experiments under real conditions in nature are much more complicated and ...

News Headlines
#115983
2018-02-15

White nose syndrome is killing millions of bats via a contagious fungus – here's how to stop it

A dangerous fungus has been sweeping across North America with devastating consequences. In the past decade, between 5m and 7m bats in the US and Canada have been wiped out as a result of the fungal disease known as white nose syndrome, which alters their behaviour in potentially deadly ways. Bu ...

News Headlines
#115984
2018-02-15

Small lakes and temporary ponds release CO2 even when dry

Temporary lakes and ponds emit CO₂ even when they are dry, and dry areas emit a larger amount of carbon into the atmosphere. This phenomenon, described now for the first time, could have an impact on the global carbon cycle that controls Earth's climate, according to a study led by Biel Obrador ...

News Headlines
#115952
2018-02-14

Carefully managed fire can promote rare savanna species

Carefully managed fires generate the maximum diversity of birds and mammals in savannas, new research from the University of York suggests.

News Headlines
#115954
2018-02-14

A potentially powerful new antibiotic is discovered in dirt

The modern medical era began when an absent-minded British scientist named Alexander Fleming returned from vacation to find that one of the petri dishes he forgot to put away was covered in a bacteria-killing mold. He had discovered penicillin, the world's first antibiotic.

News Headlines
#115963
2018-02-14

Middle Earth preserved in giant bird dung

Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today, the study, by the University of Adelaide’s Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) and Landcare Research NZ, reconstructed the prehuman New Zealand ecosystem using coprolites ranging from 120 to 1500 years old. The ancient ...

News Headlines
#115967
2018-02-14

Silent singing crickets still going through the motions

A team of researchers with the University of St Andrews and the University of Cambridge, both in the U.K., has found that singing crickets in Hawaii have evolved to silence their singing apparatus but continue to sing inaudibly. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group ...

News Headlines
#115968
2018-02-14

Ants nurse wounded warriors back to health: study

African Matabele ants dress the wounds of comrades injured during hunting raids and nurse them back to health, according to an "astonishing" discovery reported Wednesday.

News Headlines
#115933
2018-02-09

When it comes to genes, lichens embrace sharing economy

Researchers have discovered the first known molecular evidence of obligate symbiosis in lichens, a distinctive co-evolutionary relationship that could shed new light on how and why some multicellular organisms consolidate their genomes in order to co-exist.

News Headlines
#115939
2018-02-09

High-speed cameras reveal how hummingbirds can turn on a dime

Hummingbirds are the fighter pilots of the avian world, diving and weaving at speeds of up to 55 kilometers per hour—then turning on a dime to hover midair, wings frantically beating, as they refuel on nectar. Now, through herculean efforts, researchers are one step closer to figuring out what m ...

News Headlines
#115927
2018-02-08

First report in decades of a forgotten crop pathogen calls for critical close monitoring

Scientists, breeders, farmers and conservation groups must continue to work in close collaboration to prepare for the potential re-emergence of a forgotten crop pathogen, a new study advises today.

News Headlines
#115915
2018-02-07

Hairy tongues help bats drink up

Animals have evolved all manner of adaptations to get the nutrients they need. For nectar-feeding bats, long snouts and tongues let them dip in and out of flowers while hovering in mid-air. To help the cause, their tongues are covered in tiny hairs that serve as miniature spoons to scoop and dra ...

News Headlines
#115916
2018-02-07

'Beetlejuice'—it works for real beetles too

In Tim Burton's classic comedy "Beetlejuice", the toxic title character can escape from his inferno only if someone pronounces his name three times in a row.The real-world bombardier beetle escapes from its purgatory—the belly of a predator—by squirting the real thing: boiling-hot pulses of noxi ...

News Headlines
#115917
2018-02-07

Sea ice algae blooms in the dark

Researchers from Aarhus University have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of the ice. Algae are the primary component of the Arctic food web and produce ...

News Headlines
#115898
2018-02-06

Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing

The ozone layer - which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation - is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes.

News Headlines
#115899
2018-02-06

Viruses—lots of them—are falling from the sky

An astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth's atmosphere – and falling from it – according to new research from scientists in Canada, Spain and the U.S.

News Headlines
#115900
2018-02-06

How solitary cockroaches gave rise to social termites—tales from two genomes

Termites are "social cockroaches." They evolved from ancestral solitary cockroaches some 150 million years ago, at least 50 million years before bees, ants and wasps evolved similar intricate societies independently of termites. Termites live in complex societies characterized by division of lab ...

News Headlines
#115901
2018-02-06

Dinosaurs ‘too successful for their own good’

A study mapping how dinosaurs spread across the world shows they may have been a victim of their own success. UK researchers believe they were already in decline before the killer asteroid hit because they had occupied every habitat on Earth.

News Headlines
#115903
2018-02-06

Alberta’s ecosystems shrinking faster than Amazon rain forest: report

Alberta’s ecosystems and the natural beauty they create are still largely intact but parts are disappearing at rates that exceed deforestation in the Amazon rain forest. “We continue to lose ecosystems,” said researcher Jahan Kariyeva. “That we can definitely see.”

News Headlines
#115879
2018-02-02

To understand the sea, focus on the seabed

A new review, led by Plymouth Marine Laboratory scientists, sets priorities for the benefit of future benthic research.The benthic environment is critical to marine ecosystems. It harbours a wealth of life on, in, and above the seabed, and is vital to ocean systems, marine biodiversity, and clim ...

News Headlines
#115885
2018-02-02

Highly localised and current DNA information on river animals

New research proves that environmental DNA survives for less than two days in small fast-flowing rivers and so provides highly localised and current information on species composition. This is crucial new evidence as biologists turn increasingly to new DNA sampling techniques to assess aquatic e ...

News Headlines
#115886
2018-02-02

Ants—master manipulators for biodiversity, or sweet treats

Symbiotic ants manipulate aphid reproduction rates to achieve a specific mix of green and red aphids, maintaining the inferior green aphids which produce the ants' favorite snack.

News Headlines
#115859
2018-02-01

Slow but steady: New study sheds light on the brain evolution of turtles

A new study led by the University of Birmingham shows that the brain of turtles has evolved slowly, but constantly over the last 210 million years, eventually reaching a variety in form and complexity, which rivals that of other animal groups.

News Headlines
#115860
2018-02-01

Genetic secret of English salmon

The salmon from the chalk streams of southern England appear to be genetically distinct from others. Evidence published in the Journal of Fish Biology suggests they may be a separate sub-species of Atlantic salmon.

News Headlines
#115861
2018-02-01

Scientists reveal double life of sunflower enzyme

Scientists have explained how a protein-cutting enzyme can join the ends of proteins together, creating protein circles; a finding with immediate applications in producing therapeutic drug treatments that is published in a study in the open access journal eLife.

News Headlines
#115862
2018-02-01

Arctic lakes are releasing relatively young carbon, study discovers

When Arctic permafrost soil thaws, greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere, but most of the carbon currently escaping from lakes in northern Alaska is relatively young, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

News Headlines
#115865
2018-02-01

A squid graveyard and a deep-sea buffet

A recent paper describes an unusual discovery: dead squid littered across the deep sea bottom of the Gulf of California. It's a squid graveyard that might be a boon for deep-sea animals.

News Headlines
#115866
2018-02-01

Fragmented habitats will lead to loss of insect species diversity in the near future

Together with their colleagues from the Senckenberg Nature Research Society, scientists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to show that widespread insects are threatened with a serious decline in species diversity in the near future. The research team lists the fragmentation o ...

News Headlines
#115867
2018-02-01

How Manipulating the Plant Microbiome Could Improve Agriculture

A few years ago, as a postdoc in the lab of Paul Schulze-Lefert at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, Germany, I used next-generation sequencing to study the bacterial communities that populate roots of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Although scientists had k ...

News Headlines
#115843
2018-01-31

Australian trees 'sweat' to survive extreme heatwaves, researchers reveal

Australian researchers growing trees in climate change conditions have found the leaves “sweat” to survive extreme heatwaves. The year-long experiment showed that trees continue to release water through their leaves as an evaporative cooling system during periods of extreme heat, despite the car ...

News Headlines
#115845
2018-01-31

Viruses prefer cultivated areas to natural areas

Agricultural areas are more affected by viral epidemics than non-agricultural areas. This is the finding of an international study carried out as part of a France-South Africa collaboration in floristic areas from the Western Cape and Camargue regions. These results were published in January 201 ...

News Headlines
#115838
2018-01-30

World oceans temperature hits record high

The world oceans temperature rose in 2017 to the highest point ever recorded, surpassing the previous record in 2015, according to a recent research published on Sunday by The Independent newspaper.

News Headlines
#115814
2018-01-26

“Life, uh, finds a way”—Applying lessons from evolution to go to Mars

To phrase that more scientifically, evolution has had billions of years of trial and error to produce species that are well adapted chemically and physically. Many human researchers want to imitate that adaptation, turning lessons from the natural world into practice in engineering, technology, ...

News Headlines
#115816
2018-01-26

A new type of virus found in our oceans

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have reported a new tailless virus prevalent in the world’s oceans. These viruses remained undiscovered till now as they cannot be detected using standard tests. The new find was made possible by ...

News Headlines
#115817
2018-01-26

Research finds link between rainfall and ocean circulation in past and present

Research conducted at The University of Texas at Austin has found that changes in ocean currents in the Atlantic Ocean influence rainfall in the Western Hemisphere, and that these two systems have been linked for thousands of years.

News Headlines
#115810
2018-01-25

New study shows freshwater input route from melting ice led to rapid cooling

Scientists have long known that a reduction in Atlantic Ocean currents bringing warm water to the Northern Hemisphere from the tropics created abrupt cooling known as the Younger Dryas cold period nearly 13,000 years ago, but the cause of this phenomenon has not been proved.

News Headlines
#115770
2018-01-23

The seas of Titan communicate with each other

Drawing on data taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft as recently as five months before its final plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere, scientists have found that the large northern hemisphere seas of the planet’s moon, Titan, all lie at the same elevation, just like the Earth’s oceans.

News Headlines
#115774
2018-01-23

Interacting Antarctic glaciers may cause faster melt and sea level contributions

A new study shows that a large and potentially unstable Antarctic glacier may be melting farther inland than previously thought and that this melting could affect the stability of another large glacier nearby – an important finding for understanding and projecting ice sheet contributions to sea- ...

News Headlines
#115776
2018-01-23

Rethinking environmental legislation to include the conservation ideas of tomorrow

Rewilding has potential to help address the current global biodiversity crisis, but its impact will be limited unless agreed definitions can be reached, backed by further scientific research and helped by a policy backdrop that enables greater integration with current environmental legislation. ...

News Headlines
#115781
2018-01-23

Biomarkers helped solving the mystery of 500-million-year-old macroorganisms

Researchers have conducted chemical analysis of biomarkers remaining after the decomposition of the genus Beltanelliformis. These organisms populated the Earth in the Ediacaran period (about 575-541 million years ago), and their position on the evolutionary tree was unknown. The data show that B ...

News Headlines
#115782
2018-01-23

Scientists discover 'Legos of life'

Scientists have found the “Legos of life” – four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism – after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts. The four building blocks make energy available for ...

News Headlines
#115783
2018-01-23

Genetic study of plains zebra finds that six subspecies made by appearance-only do not match genetic evidence

A team of researchers with members from Denmark, the U.S., Portugal and France has found that the six subspecies classifications currently used to categorize plains zebras living in Africa do not match with genetic evidence. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, the ...

News Headlines
#115761
2018-01-22

The Pentagon is one huge pile of ancient bugs, but don’t start evacuating just yet

New research shows that several famous buildings including the Pentagon in the US or the British Museum in London are giant heaps of microbes. No, really.

News Headlines
#115763
2018-01-22

DNA untangles Gabon’s complex web of frog species

When Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute conservation biologist Jessica Deichmann joined a project to determine how the construction of a road in Gabon’s Moukalaba-Doudou National Park would affect amphibians in the area, she quickly realized something surprising: the frogs living there a ...

News Headlines
#115740
2018-01-19

First Global Atlas of Soil Bacteria

What lives in your dirt? CU Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.

News Headlines
#115741
2018-01-19

Study says the world’s most vilified and dangerous animals may be humankind’s best ally

Christopher O’Bryan, the lead author based at UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences said the study revealed examples where native predators, ranging from leopards and bats to scavengers such as vultures, provide critical services including disease regulation, agricultural productivity, a ...

News Headlines
#115720
2018-01-18

A survival lesson from bats—eating variety keeps species multiplying

Diet is an important factor influencing the survival and evolution of all species. Many studies have shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. But a new study published in Ecology Letters reveals that ...

News Headlines
#115721
2018-01-18

Hanging with the locals pays off for tropical invaders

Studying the behaviour of tropical fish in a temperate environment can help predict who might be winners and losers in a warmer future, and how resources such as fish stocks may be impacted, researchers say.

News Headlines
#115710
2018-01-17

Measuring metabolism in dolphins to calculate their caloric needs

A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one in Spain has measured the metabolism of wild bottlenose dolphins in an effort to better understand their caloric needs. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes measuring the dolphi ...

News Headlines
#115686
2018-01-16

Mantis Shrimp Biomimicry: Stomatopod’s Dactyl Club Could Inspire Aerospace Materials, Football Helmets

There is a lot science has learnt from nature, and studying the finer details of animals to model machinery after them even has a name — biomimicry. The latest example is that of one of the more unusual creatures in nature, the mantis shrimp.

News Headlines
#115691
2018-01-16

Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas

Australia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure.

News Headlines
#115677
2018-01-15

Identifying species via environmental DNA

Environmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, ...

News Headlines
#115678
2018-01-15

How flowering plants conquered the world

Scientists think they have the answer to a puzzle that baffled even Charles Darwin: How flowers evolved and spread to become the dominant plants on Earth. Flowering plants, or angiosperms, make up about 90% of all living plant species, including most food crops.

News Headlines
#115654
2018-01-11

Shark biologist teams up with aerospace engineer to discover behaviors of oceanic whitetips

A team of scientists that included shark biologists, an aerospace engineer and statisticians spent several years developing precise calculations based on the oceanic whitetip's average size, swimming location, water temperatures, location of prey in the water and daily activities. The team was l ...

News Headlines
#115628
2017-12-21

Fungal disease poses global threat to snakes

A potentially deadly fungal disease poses a significant threat to snakes all over the world, new research suggests. The pathogen, has been found in 23 species of wild snake in the US and three in Europe. The fungus causes lesions on the snake's body, leading to infection and death.

News Headlines
#115634
2017-12-21

Study shows protected tropical forests are threatened by the bounty of adjacent oil palm plantations

A new study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has warned of the threat that oil palm production poses to tropical forests.

News Headlines
#115608
2017-12-20

Action needed now to save forest area the size of India

An area of forest the size of India will be lost by 2050 unless carbon pricing and anti-deforestation policies are put in place.hat is the primary finding of a new study carried out by researchers from the Center for Global Development, Washington, DC, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, pu ...

News Headlines
#115611
2017-12-20

On a Cuban Reef, A Precarious Partnership on Scientific Research

The world’s coral reefs are in increasingly dire shape as pollution, coastal development, overfishing, and — perhaps most ominously — bleaching from rising ocean temperatures exact a mounting toll. But relatively intact and healthy coral reefs still exist, and among the best of them is the Garde ...

News Headlines
#115618
2017-12-20

How fungus manipulate fruit flies into hosting spores and releasing them

A team of researchers at the University of California has learned more about the means by which a type of fungus invades fruit flies, takes over their bodies and uses them to reproduce. In their paper uploaded to the bioRxiv preprint server, the group describes their study of the relationship be ...

News Headlines
#115620
2017-12-20

Fish sex so loud it could deafen dolphins

A species of Mexican fish amasses in reproductive orgies so loud they can deafen other sea animals, awed scientists said Wednesday, calling for preservation of the "spectacle" threatened by overfishing.

News Headlines
#115598
2017-12-19

Major threats to soil ecosystems from a combination of invasive species and climate change

Soil ecosystems are critical for agriculture, biodiversity and human well-being. Poor soil health means a poor planetary outlook.

News Headlines
#115599
2017-12-19

How tall trees move sugars

Scientists have long assumed that the sugars that nourish trees are pushed by water pressure from the leaves where they are created to the stems and roots where they are needed.

News Headlines
#115600
2017-12-19

Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers

A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat.

News Headlines
#115574
2017-12-18

High Arctic fossils reveal ancient bear's weakness for sweets

Two bears living in a boreal forest in Canada's High Arctic millions of years ago munched on too many sweets and didn't brush their teeth, fossil evidence suggests.

News Headlines
#115584
2017-12-18

New study shows how birds work to sing together

A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses.

News Headlines
#115518
2017-12-08

Earth’s Hum: Scientists Record The Very Sound Of Earth—But Don't Know Why It Happens

Scientists have recorded the mysterious sound of the Earth deep underwater for the first time. The eerie hum is could be key to understanding the make-up of the planet itself—but no one knows what makes it.

News Headlines
#115521
2017-12-08

Disappearing sea snakes surprise researchers with hidden genetic diversity

New research suggests an urgent need to find out why sea snakes are disappearing from known habitats, after it was discovered some seemingly identical sea snake populations are actually genetically distinct from each other and can't simply repopulate if one group dies out.

News Headlines
#115494
2017-12-06

It's good to be rare, for some species

When most people think of rare species, they think of endangered ones that humans have caused to be rare through habitat loss, poaching, climate change and other disturbances. But some species have always been rare -- occurring in small densities throughout their range -- throughout their evolut ...

News Headlines
#115498
2017-12-06

Extreme fieldwork, drones, climate modeling yield new insights about Greenland's melting ice sheet

A new UCLA-led study reinforces the importance of collaboration in assessing the effects of climate change.The research, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers new insights about previously unknown factors affecting Greenland's melting ice sheet, a ...

News Headlines
#115507
2017-12-06

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Regional Bureau for Sciences in the Arab States Celebrates its 70th Anniversary

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), in cooperation with the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Egypt and the Egyptian National Commission for UNESCO, celebrates the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the UNESCO Regional Bureau ...

News Headlines
#115459
2017-12-05

Oxygen Surge 400 Million Years Ago Helped Trigger an Explosion in Biodiversity

Scientists have linked a surge in Earth’s oxygen levels some 455 million years ago with an explosion in biodiversity on the planet, as nature took advantage of the extra breathing space to transform marine life and develop new species.

News Headlines
#115476
2017-12-05

Study sheds new light on how animals and plants respond to changes in the environment

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered that living creatures' responsiveness to changes in the environment can evolve and depends on the conditions they experienced in their past.

News Headlines
#115477
2017-12-05

Stronger storms hamper ability of streams and rivers to clean up pollution

Freshwater streams and rivers naturally clean up some forms of pollution originating from urban and agricultural areas, but increased storm intensity reduces this ability, which underscores the need to improve the management of nonpoint sources of pollution and storm water management, according ...

News Headlines
#115436
2017-12-04

Crop gene discovery gets to the root of food security

Researchers from The University of Queensland have discovered that a key gene which controls flowering time in wheat and barley crops also directs the plant's root growth.

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