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Meeting
#5786

World Oceans Day 2018 (http://www.un.org/en/events/oceansday/)

8 June 2018, New York, United States of America

Meeting
#5784

World Bee Day 2018

20 May 2018, New York, United States of America

News Headlines
#116281
2018-03-20

Global biodiversity 'crisis' to be assessed at major summit

Paris – Earth is enduring a mass species extinction, scientists say – the first since the demise of the dinosaurs and only the sixth in half-a-billion years.

News Headlines
#116282
2018-03-20

Sudan, last male northern white rhino, dies in Kenya

The world's last surviving male northern white rhino has died after months of ill health, his carers said. Sudan, 45, lived at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. He was put to sleep on Monday after age-related complications worsened significantly.

News Headlines
#116287
2018-03-20

Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon stores

In the summer of 2010-2011 Western Australia experienced an unprecedented marine heat wave that elevated water temperatures 2-4°C above average for more than 2 months. The heat wave resulted in defoliation of the dominant Amphibolis antarctica seagrass species across the iconic Shark Bay World H ...

News Headlines
#116292
2018-03-20

Five new species of frogs identified in museum collections

Researchers from Yale-NUS College and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences have discovered five new species of Southeast Asian frogs from a group of museum specimens that had long been considered to only contain two species. This research by lead author Yale-NUS College Assistant Profes ...

News Headlines
#116263
2018-03-15

Decreased oxygen levels could present hidden threat to marine species

Species living in coastal regions could face a significant future threat from reduced levels of oxygen in the marine environment, according to research published in Scientific Reports.

News Headlines
#116265
2018-03-15

Mountains become islands: Ecological dangers of increasing land use in East Africa

The mountains of East Africa are a treasure trove of biodiversity. However, their ecosystems may be at a higher risk than previously realized. Scientists have discovered that Mount Kilimanjaro is turning into an "ecological island". Agriculture and housing construction have eliminated the natura ...

News Headlines
#116266
2018-03-15

Small mammal thought to be extinct rediscovered in Nepal's national park

The hispid hare (Caprolagus hispidus) is in the list of critically endangered small mammals. It was thought to be extinct from Chitwan National Park as it had not been spotted again after its first spotting in 1984.

News Headlines
#116267
2018-03-15

13 European countries to protect great bustard

Delegates from 13 European countries on Thursday agreed on transboundary conservation measures for the great bustard - the heaviest flying bird in Europe.

News Headlines
#116269
2018-03-15

Activists eye bigger roles for local officials, businesses in Indonesia’s orangutan protection plan

The Indonesian government is drafting another 10-year guideline for orangutan conservation that aims to staunch the decline in the population of the critically endangered great ape.

News Headlines
#116271
2018-03-15

Report: Unchecked Climate Change Will Lead to Widespread Biodiversity Loss

The world will see enormous losses of biodiversity across all species groups on every continent by the end of this century if we do not make deep cuts to global greenhouse emissions, according to groundbreaking research from the WWF and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change at the University of ...

News Headlines
#116272
2018-03-15

How Can Municipalities Protect Biodiversity And Engage In Conservation?

Municipalities often find themselves struggling to reconcile numerous conflicting interests when it comes to the balancing conservation and urban growth. As the world's biodiversity increasingly comes under threat, including from urban expansion into natural areas, municipalities are recognizing ...

News Headlines
#116275
2018-03-15

High hopes for the critically endangered regent honeyeater following Gippsland discovery

Conservationists say the discovery of critically endangered regent honeyeaters in south-east Victoria is a promising sign of the bird species' recovery.

News Headlines
#116242
2018-03-14

Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hotspots

Up to half of plant and animal species in the world’s most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked.

News Headlines
#116243
2018-03-14

Marine ecologists study the effects of giant kelp on groups of organisms in the underwater forest ecosystem

When British naturalist Charles Darwin traveled to the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he took notice of the giant kelp forests ringing the islands. He believed that if those forests were destroyed, a significant number of species would be lost. These underwater ecosystems, Darwin believed, could be ...

News Headlines
#116254
2018-03-14

Pre-Columbian people spread fruit species across Latin America

Prehistoric humans helped spread edible fruit species across Central and South America, even as they wiped out the megafauna that had done so previously. In the process, we maintained and even expanded the plants’ habitats, increased biodiversity, and engineered ecosystems on two continents. Tod ...

News Headlines
#116222
2018-03-08

A global conflict: Agricultural production vs. biodiversity

Smart land-use planning could ease the conflict between agricultural production and nature conservation. A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the UFZ and the University of Münster integrated global datasets on the ...

News Headlines
#116223
2018-03-08

Tackling Ireland’s alien invaders

The Japanese knotweed, rhododendron and giant hogweed are fast becoming household names as these pests continue to invade Irish landscapes. These ill-famed plants are just some of many invasive species causing destruction to Ireland’s ecosystems.

News Headlines
#116225
2018-03-08

Let Us Take A Moment To Remember The 15 Species That Went Down With The Azure Window

One year ago today, the iconic Azure Window came crashing down, making the news worldwide. A 28-metre-tall natural arch on the island of Gozo, the Window was also the home of a unique ecosystem that is now extinct.

News Headlines
#116226
2018-03-08

Climate change could impact biodiversity, study says

A new study from researchers at the University of Minnesota suggests changing climate conditions can influence both species distribution and the rate of evolution.

News Headlines
#116227
2018-03-08

Two new species of stone centipedes found hiding in larch forests in China

Scientists described two species of previously unknown stone centipedes from China. Now housed at the Hengshui University, China, where all members of the team work, the studied specimens were all collected in the leaf litter or under rocks in larch forests.

News Headlines
#116181
2018-03-06

The 8 million species we live with but don’t know

The history of conservation is a story of many victories in a losing war. Having served on the boards of global conservation organisations for more than 30 years, I know very well the sweat, tears and even blood shed by those who dedicate their lives to saving species. Their efforts have led to ...

News Headlines
#116182
2018-03-06

From foe to friend: how carnivores could help farmers

Across the globe, the numbers of carnivore species such as leopards, dingoes, and spectacled bears are rapidly declining. The areas they occupy are also getting smaller each year. This is a problem, because carnivores are incredibly important to ecosystems as they may provide services such as bi ...

News Headlines
#116183
2018-03-06

Patagonia may lose its only native bumblebee due to alien bee invasion

Patagonia's giant bumblebee is now considered endangered due to invasions of alien bee species, according to a new study.Marcelo Aizen, from the Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Argentina, and colleagues from four other countries draw attention to the severe conservation, economic and political ...

News Headlines
#116186
2018-03-06

Extreme weather, forest loss behind sharp drop in monarch butterfly sightings

Right about now, the kings of the butterfly world are emerging from hibernation in Mexico looking for love and ready to make more butterflies. But scientists Monday said the number of monarch butterflies which will start their annual, 5,000-kilometre migration north to Canadian gardens and wild ...

News Headlines
#116188
2018-03-06

Stopping the impact of fishing fleets on the most threatened marine birds

Accidental by-catch, which affects around 5,000 birds stuck in longlines every year, is the most severe effect on marine birds by the fishing activity in the Mediterranean. The exploitation of fishing resources threatens the future of many marine birds with regression populations, such as the Co ...

News Headlines
#116170
2018-03-05

One-fifth of Europe's wood beetles at risk of extinction as ancient trees decline

Almost one-fifth of Europe’s wood beetles are at risk of extinction due to a widespread decline in ancient trees, according to a new report which suggests their demise could have devastating knock-on effects for other species.

News Headlines
#116148
2018-03-01

Disappearing act

The Asian tiger mosquito -- carrier of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya and Zika -- appears to have vanished from Palmyra. Not native to the small atoll 1,000 miles south of Hawaii, Aedes albopict likely came to Palmyra during World War II, when the United St ...

News Headlines
#116150
2018-03-01

New wax plant named after Inday Sara

Davao City – A team of experts in biodiversity named a species of the Philippine Hoya found in the province of Dinagat Islands in Caraga region after City Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio.

News Headlines
#116156
2018-03-01

Search for vanishing frogs leads to discovery of new species

FIU biologist Alessandro Catenazzi went in search of vanishing frogs in the Amazon. What he found was an entirely new species.

News Headlines
#116123
2018-02-28

New federal budget makes historic investment in nature

The Canadian government took a significant step toward protecting species at risk today with a $1.3 billion budget commitment over five years. World Wildlife Fund Canada welcomes this important and historic investment in nature.

News Headlines
#116125
2018-02-28

Budget 2018: Feds commit $500 million to conservation funding

The funding reflects the Liberals' commitment to safeguard at least 17 per cent of Canadian land and inland waters by 2020, including migratory bird territory.

News Headlines
#116137
2018-02-28

New clues to decline of bees and other pollinators

The brightly-coloured flies may be picking up bee viruses as they forage at the same flowers. And scientists think hoverflies could then be spreading the deadly infections long distances when they migrate.

News Headlines
#116138
2018-02-28

This is why African Elephants will go extinct soon!

Recently, a group of scientists got genetic evidence of interbreeding among the ancestors of modern-elephants, mammoths, and mastodons occurring during the Pleistocene Epoch. They found out that the three modern-day species of elephants have distinct genetic profiles and their ancestors interbre ...

News Headlines
#116139
2018-02-28

Tigers are rapidly disappearing all across SE Asia

An assessment of 112 protected sites across 11 countries found 35% of them, the majority of which are in southeast Asia, had major management issues which left their tiger populations at risk of rapid declines or vanishing entirely.

News Headlines
#116103
2018-02-27

One of World’s Oldest Animals Records Ocean Climate Change

The sea is home to some 5,000 species of sponges. These multicelled animals first appeared about 800 million years ago. Although they lack muscles, bones, and a nervous system, one particular species has something that scientists want: information on the state of the climate thousands of years ago.

News Headlines
#116108
2018-02-27

Brazilian study discovers six new species of silky antieaters

Since the pioneering description made in 1758 by Swedish naturalist and father of taxonomy Carl Nilsson Linnaeus (1707-1778), there was officially one single silky anteater species. This short-snouted, pigmy-sized anteater would then be known for its scientific name, Cyclopes didactyla, after it ...

News Headlines
#116113
2018-02-27

Scientists are racing to save Europe's beloved ash tree

A fungus spreading rapidly east to west across Europe is wiping out valuable forests. Scientists are racing to plant and multiply resistant strains before the species disappears.

News Headlines
#116116
2018-02-27

African countries urged to harmonize laws on invasive species

African governments should harmonize their laws to safeguard countries from the invasive species, an expert said on Tuesday. Martha Byanyima, expert on Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) at the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), said many countries have experienced devastating ...

News Headlines
#116118
2018-02-27

5.5 million-year-old fossil turtle species sheds light on invasive modern relatives

A University of Pennsylvania paleontologist has described a 5.5 million-year-old fossil species of turtle from eastern Tennessee. It represents a new species of the genus Trachemys, commonly known as sliders, which are frequently kept as pets today.

News Headlines
#116091
2018-02-26

New Shark Species Discovered In Atlantic Ocean: Here's What Makes The Third Sixgill Shark So Special

A team of scientists have discovered a new shark species, specifically the third kind of sixgill shark, in the Atlantic Ocean. What differentiates the Atlantic sixgill shark from its cousins in the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean, and why are these sharks so special?

News Headlines
#116093
2018-02-26

The terrifying phenomenon that is pushing species towards extinction

There was almost something biblical about the scene of devastation that lay before Richard Kock as he stood in the wilderness of the Kazakhstan steppe. Dotted across the grassy plain, as far as the eye could see, were the corpses of thousands upon thousands of saiga antelopes. All appeared to ha ...

News Headlines
#116094
2018-02-26

Geological change confirmed as a factor behind the extensive diversity in tropical rainforests

The tropical rainforests of Central and South America are home to the largest diversity of plants on this planet. Nowhere else are there quite so many different plant species in one place. However, the entire region is increasingly threatened by human activity, which is why researchers are stepp ...

News Headlines
#116096
2018-02-26

Climate change draws invasive species to the Arctic

The Arctic is changing. Temperatures are increasing twice as fast as the global average and sea ice is retreating quicker than predicted.

News Headlines
#116099
2018-02-26

Wildlife trafficking is crippling the planet

We are currently in the midst of the sixth mass extinction. We are losing plants and animals at an alarming rate and humans are to blame. One vof the most serious threats to biodiversity loss is wildlife trafficking, writes MEP Catherine Bearder.

News Headlines
#116073
2018-02-22

Cryptic New Species of Shark Identified: Atlantic Sixgill Shark

The sixgill sharks of the genus Hexanchus are large, rarely encountered deep-sea sharks. With ancestors dating back over 250 million years, well before dinosaurs, they are among the oldest creatures on Earth.

News Headlines
#116078
2018-02-22

‘Photo Ark’ a quest to document global biodiversity: Q&A with photographer Joel Sartore and director Chun-Wei Yi

At turns haunting, humorous or just downright bizarre, the studio portraits of the thousands of animal species that photographer Joel Sartore has collected are more than just a catalog of life on Earth. When someone sees one of his photographs for the National Geographic Photo Ark, Sartore wants ...

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Results for: "migratory species"
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