What's new?

  • On 10th December, the sixth meeting of the Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management was held at COP 13. The members discussed the recently adopted decision XIII/8 and the CPW Work Plan for 2017-2018. Proposed activities over the next year include a wildlife forum and the development of additional factsheets. IIED was also welcomed to the CPW as a new member.
  • Issues of gender inequalities have become the focus of many government and non-governmental development and conservation agendas. Gender relations are integral to the bushmeat value chain and the demand for wildlife parts. However, the role gender plays is often over looked in Sustainable Wildlife Management. At COP 13 these topics were discussed at a side-event for the launch of the fifth CPW factsheet on gender and SWM. TRAFFIC, a member of the CPW, explained the role of gender dimensions in driving consumer demand for wildlife products and pointed out that women play a key role at leading change in the societies of the main consumer countries.
  • "A threat to elephants anywhere is a threat to elephants everywhere" read more
  • South Africa's minister of Water and Environmental Affairs, Edna Molewa delivered a speech at the opening of the 17th CITES meeting. Some of the topics to be discussed include the legal and sustainable wildlife trade and the role of CITES in securing livelihoods for people who live near wildlife. read more
  • From 1-10 September 2016, the CBD attended the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) World Conservation Congress. A workshop was held with the IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods (SULi) Specialist Group, entitled “Does Hunting Have a Future?” There was a wide range of speakers who shared their experiences on the important role of hunting in many parts of the world. One of the speakers, Hawaiian activist Walter Ritte captured the overall message of the meeting "If we are to survive the onslaught of the greed of corporate commercialism which is threatening the very life of our world’s natural resources, we need to heed the proven values and customs of traditional peoples and their thousands of years of proven experience. Hunting is and has always been an honorable tradition." read more
  • On 26th February, the European Commission adopted a Communication on the EU Action Plan against Wildlife Trafficking which details efforts to fight wildlife crime inside the EU, and the EU's role in the global fight against these illegal activities. read more .
  • Vultures are being targeted for the bushmeat trade read more
  • New study throws light on South Africa’s Lion bone trade read more
  • Black rhino's translocated into the Sera Community Conservancy read more
  • Indigenous rangers protect the threatened black-flanked rock wallaby in Australia read more
  • The United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution on tackling illicit trafficking in wildlife. Resolution A/RES/69/314, recognised that “the protection of wildlife must be part of a comprehensive approach to achieving poverty eradication, food security, sustainable development, including the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, economic growth, social well-being and sustainable livelihoods.” read more

  • United Nations
  • United Nations Environment Programme