Frequently Asked Questions

1. The Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People

The Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People is a voluntary commitment platform that aims to raise public awareness, building on the existing and growing momentum, of urgent action from a broad base of sub and non-state actors in support of the implementation of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. As a non-negotiated solution space, it profiles commitments from all relevant sectors in support of the three objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity, while enabling the mapping of ambition and urgency, to assess integrated actions, partnerships and impact.

The Action Agenda online platform, currently hosts 290 plus commitments on 11 action areas: food systems and health; freshwater, coastal and ocean ecosystems; conservation and restoration of land ecosystem; climate change mitigation and adaptation; conservation and sustainable use of species; sustainable consumption and production; stewardship/ good governance; urban sustainability; green finance; biosafety; and access to benefit-sharing.

In its 2-year existence, the Action Agenda will require a further mandate, with required capacities, to continue its work to engage sub and non-state actors to submit relevant commitments, as well as to showcase in each of the 11 action areas, key actions to reverse nature loss, while also contributing to the future review mechanism of the Convention in support of the implementation of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. https://www.cbd.int/action-agenda/

2. Non-state actors’ relationship to the post-2020 process

The Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People is critical to the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework process in many ways. For example, this agenda can:

1. showcase in each of the 11 action areas, key actions to reverse nature loss (aligned to the GBO5 transition points); 2. demonstrate, through individual and cooperative commitments from sub and non-state actors, that a significant number of actors are already committed to the necessary transition points recommended by GBO5; 3. support further implementation at the global, domestic and local levels, through cooperative initiatives across sectors and stakeholders in support of the post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework’s goals; 4. encourage others to follow the same essential path because it is in their best interest; 5. contribute to raising public awareness about the risks of nature loss for people, the planet and the economy; 6. fit with the sense of the urgency needed to transform our societies, and inspire action and collaboration between all stakeholders; 7. connect climate and nature actions, as well as broader economic, social and ecological considerations; 8. strengthen engagement with key economic sectors to help addresses the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) drivers of nature loss and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) systemic transformation pathway on land and natural systems; 9. inform the development of policy frameworks to transform economic and financial systems to accelerate action aligned to the post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.

3. Opportunity to leverage the Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People

This September, at the 2020 UNGA Biodiversity Summit, the Heads of State created a momentum for nature at the highest political level. Several announcements were issued in support of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.. Among them the Leader’s Pledge for Nature, signed by 77 countries and supported by a suite of sub and non-state actors, provides momentum and solutions to increase the overall ambition in the lead up to CBD fifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP15).

Several reports undertaken by governments and non-state actors have also been produced in 2020 demonstrating the economic rationale for valuing nature in key sectors, which builds necessary momentum to the CBD COP in 2021.

These, and other biodiversity focused announcements, provide an opportunity for the Sharm El Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda to connect and profile the growing ambition from sub and non-state actors’ commitments, maintaining the momentum to COP15, as Parties negotiate the goals and targets for the new global biodiversity framework, to be adopted in 2021.

Further opportunities are being explored to ensure that sub and non-state actor commitments also contribute to future reports on implementation, to aggregate the level of ambition set to achieve the targets in the post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. Further details are presented in Subsidiary Body on Implementation (SBI) report CBD/SBI/3/11 entitled: “Options to enhance planning, reporting, and review mechanisms with a view to strengthening the implementation of the Convention”. An information document will also be made available on “further information and draft template for commitments to the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework”. A CBD webinar on these inter-related issues is also foreseen in December 2020.

4. How the Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People contributes to the success of the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework process

The current global landscape indicates that there is growing attention and demand to address the drivers of nature loss. There is also greater attention on synergies between climate and nature, and the allocation of resources for real implementation in line with the post 2020 framework. COVID-19 has also revealed clear interconnections between people, biodiversity and human health, and broader implications to the global economy.

These challenges entail shared responsibility. It requires collective efforts at the global and domestic levels. Governments alone cannot undertake the magnitude of the challenge. To achieve the 2030 goals and targets of the post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework will entail the support of sub and non-state actors.

The business and financial sectors, sub-national governments and local authorities, civil society, academia, youth and indigenous peoples and local communities must be part of the conversation, in particular as discussions underway by the formal process, on what is to be achieved in the Global Biodiversity Framework and how, will require coordination at all levels.

Moreover, it is visible that the Action Agenda for Nature and People is already happening and continuously growing in numbers, commitments and ambition. Analyses of sub and non-state actor agendas in other processes show that successful multilateral processes are based on the principles of inclusiveness and openness.