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Meeting
#6166

6th European Congress of Conservation Biology: “Biodiversity crisis in a changing world”

22 - 26 August 2022, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic

News Headlines
#130554
2021-09-23

Bat guts become less healthy through diet of 'fast food' from banana plantations

Nectar-feeding bats foraging in intensively managed banana plantations in Costa Rica have a less diverse set of gut microbes in comparison to bats feeding in their natural forest habitat or organic plantations, reveals new research published today in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

News Headlines
#130555
2021-09-23

Lake Maracaibo, lightning capital of the world

One firebolt after another illuminates a stilt-house settlement where the Catatumbo river flows into Venezuela's Lake Maracaibo, the lightning capital of the world.

News Headlines
#130560
2021-09-23

The secret life of baby octopuses

Some of the most amazing creatures live in the deep blue sea. Cuttlefish, squids and octopuses, for example. These soft-bodied cephalopods have a strikingly sophisticated nervous system, camera-like eyes, three hearts, and an extraordinary ability to switch the color and texture of their skin to ...

News Headlines
#130561
2021-09-23

Female skinks store sperm for dry spells

Female tree skinks can reproduce even when they have not encountered a male for more than a year, by storing sperm from previous mates, according to new research.

News Headlines
#130562
2021-09-23

Non-native fish are main consumers of salmon in reservoirs

When warmwater fish species like bass, walleye and crappie that are not native to the Pacific Northwest, but prized by some anglers, overlap with baby spring chinook salmon in reservoirs in Oregon's Willamette River they consume more baby salmon than native fish per individual, new research found.

News Headlines
#130563
2021-09-23

Creating chicory plants without bitter compounds

Researchers have used new breeding techniques to develop a chicory variety that no longer contains bitter compounds. Katarina Cankar, plant researcher at Wageningen University & Research: "In the European CHIC project, we are working on improved industrial chicory varieties (related to witloof) ...

News Headlines
#130564
2021-09-23

Low-level helicopter flights map mineral deposits near Salmon, Idaho

The result of a geophysical survey in a remote part of eastern Idaho could have economic impacts on the Gem State by identifying locations to extract cobalt and other minerals.

News Headlines
#130565
2021-09-23

How fish can still be part of a more sustainable food future

If you want to reduce your personal impact on the environment, cutting back on eating animal products is one of the simplest things you can do. But becoming vegan and eating only plants is unlikely to be an appropriate solution for everyone in the world.

News Headlines
#130510
2021-09-22

Soft corals, hard problem: New technique reveals corals vulnerable to bleaching

UNSW marine biologists have developed a method for identifying Australia's soft corals that are most vulnerable—and most resistant—to rising sea temperatures and episodes of coral bleaching, and therefore, which species are in most urgent need of protection.

News Headlines
#130519
2021-09-22

Revealing hidden extinction risk in Madagascar's rare plant species

For many species, there is a lack of information needed to make extinction risk assessments—a problem that is particularly acute in biodiverse regions such as Madagascar. Scientists also fear that current methods of assessing extinction risk may underestimate the problem.

News Headlines
#130521
2021-09-22

Study: Expanding teleworking would reduce pollution by up to 10%

A study by the ICTA-UAB analyzes different proposals for the implementation of telework based on mobility and air quality data obtained in Barcelona during the lockdown.

News Headlines
#130522
2021-09-22

Infants have more microplastics in their feces than adults, study finds

Microplastics—tiny plastic pieces less than 5 mm in size—are everywhere, from indoor dust to food to bottled water. So it's not surprising that scientists have detected these particles in the feces of people and pets.

News Headlines
#130528
2021-09-22

Melting of polar ice shifting Earth itself, not just sea levels

The melting of polar ice is not only shifting the levels of our oceans, it is changing the planet Earth itself. Newly minted Ph.D. Sophie Coulson and her colleagues explained in a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters that, as glacial ice from Greenland, Antarctica, and the Arctic Islands ...

News Headlines
#130487
2021-09-20

Scientists uncover pathogen's similar impact on two very different crops

Bacterial blight leads to browning and sometimes the death of important crops. Most famously, late blight of potato resulted in the Great Irish Famine. Blight continues today, affecting crops around the world. One form of bacterial blight (caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis or Pcal) ...

News Headlines
#130488
2021-09-20

Extreme volcanism did not cause the massive extinction of species in the late Cretaceous

A study published in the journal Geology rules out that extreme volcanic episodes had any influence on the massive extinction of species in the late Cretaceous. The results confirm the hypothesis that it was a giant meteorite impact what caused the great biological crisis that ended up with the ...

News Headlines
#130489
2021-09-20

Conservation study: Fostering wanderlust benefits pandas

In the ongoing quest to understand what makes a good wildlife habitat, surprising new research shows there may be too much of a good thing when it comes to pinpointing optimal conditions. Embracing somewhat reduced standards can be good news to conservation managers.

News Headlines
#130490
2021-09-20

Pandemic workaround: Keeping eyes on Pacific water quality from afar

A Griffith University researcher has overcome a key challenge posed by the COVID-19 pandemic to lead a monitoring program in Vanuatu aiming to improve the water quality of a popular lagoon used for fishing and swimming.

News Headlines
#130491
2021-09-20

Male seahorses develop placentas to support their growing babies

Supplying oxygen to their growing offspring and removing carbon dioxide is a major challenge for every pregnant animal. Humans deal with this problem by developing a placenta, but in seahorses—where the male, not the female, gestates and gives birth to the young—exactly how it worked hasn't alwa ...

News Headlines
#130492
2021-09-20

Deer with blood dripping from antlers seen in Smoky Mountains. Why is this happening?

Scary-looking deer with blood and strips of flesh dripping from their antlers have been seen roaming Great Smoky Mountains National Park in recent weeks.

News Headlines
#130493
2021-09-20

Digital data drives better soil management

When we think about limited resources in agriculture, water is normally the first that springs to mind. The bad news is that just like water, soil is a finite resource that is fast deteriorating as a result of human activity. The good news: Research is providing farmers, landowners and policymak ...

News Headlines
#130494
2021-09-20

Leaving by staying: Dispersal decisions of young giraffes

Dispersal, the process where animals reaching sexual maturity move away from family, is important for maintaining genetic diversity and is key to the long-term persistence of natural populations.

News Headlines
#130497
2021-09-20

Preserved penguin poop reveals past Antarctic Ocean circulation changes

Preserved penguin poop may be the key to connecting past Antarctic Ocean conditions and penguin populations, shedding light on how the birds and the region's ecosystem might fare as the climate changes.

News Headlines
#130498
2021-09-20

Quantifying the ecosystem services of glaciers highlights their importance to humankind

As the world's glaciers disappear, one group of scientists is seeking to understand their impact on humans before they are gone. By applying the ecosystem services framework to glaciers, the authors of an August 2021 paper published in Ecosystem Services hope to drive home the important role tha ...

News Headlines
#130499
2021-09-20

After the flood disaster in Western Germany: Science searches for answers

On 14 July 2021, between 60 and 180 mm of rain fell in the Eifel region in just 22 hours—an amount that would otherwise have fallen in several months and which led to catastrophic flooding.

News Headlines
#130502
2021-09-20

Study: Unite solutions to climate and biodiversity crises to save life on earth

Leading experts on the ecological impacts of climate change are calling for urgent action to align the climate and biodiversity agendas to ensure that low cost, low risk, low maintenance opportunities to jointly and efficiently address these two environmental issues are prioritized and implemented.

News Headlines
#130442
2021-09-15

Ancient spider mom preserved in amber found to be protecting her young

A trio of researchers with Capital Normal University in China has found evidence of a mother spider protecting her young in an amber sample dated back to 99 million years ago. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Xiangbo Guo, Paul Selden and Dong Rend describe where th ...

News Headlines
#130443
2021-09-15

A novel fly species discovered in Finland

Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the Zoological Museum of the University of Turku have published in the journal ZooKeys an official description for Scenopinus jerei, a new fly species from Finland.

News Headlines
#130444
2021-09-15

Scientists are hanging rhinos upside-down from helicopters: Here's why

Each year, a selection of apparently weird and pointless scientific experiments receive the Ig Nobel Prize. Awarded by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research, the prize honors projects that "first make people laugh, and then make them think."

News Headlines
#130445
2021-09-15

Copying the small structures of Salvinia leaves

Several plants and animals have evolved surfaces with long-term (i.e., days to months) air-retainability to prevent wetting and submersion. One example is Salvinia, a plant floating on water. The secret "how do they maintain an air-mattress" has been unraveled by researchers.

News Headlines
#130446
2021-09-15

Foraging habits and tactics, diet and activity levels reveal how two octopus species coexist

There are more than 300 species of octopus living in diverse habitats that span coral reefs, seagrass beds, sand plains and polar ice regions where they feed on lower trophic levels. Most famous for having eight arms (octopus comes from the Greek, octópus, which means "eight foot"), the behavior ...

News Headlines
#130447
2021-09-15

Bandicoot species 'back from the brink' on Australian mainland

A small nocturnal marsupial that once roamed the Australian mainland has been brought back from the brink of extinction after a decades-long conservation effort, authorities said Wednesday.

News Headlines
#130448
2021-09-15

Primate mothers may carry infants after death as a way of grieving, study finds

Some primate species may express grief over the death of their infant by carrying the corpse with them, sometimes for months, according to a new UCL-led study—with implications for our understanding of how non-human animals experience emotion.

News Headlines
#130449
2021-09-15

Roads have far-reaching impact on chimpanzees

Roads have a negative impact on chimpanzee populations that can extend for more than 17 km, new research shows. A team led by the University of Exeter examined the impact of major and minor roads on wild western chimpanzee numbers in the eight African countries in which they live.

News Headlines
#130450
2021-09-15

18 of 20 gorillas at Atlanta's zoo have contracted COVID

At least 18 of the 20 gorillas at Atlanta's zoo have now tested positive for COVID-19, an outbreak that began just days before the zoo had hoped to obtain a veterinary vaccine for the primates, officials said Tuesday.

News Headlines
#130452
2021-09-15

New climate migration modelling puts a human face on climate impacts

New climate migration modeling work projects increased numbers of people moving within their countries in the developing world—as many as 216 million internal migrants by 2050. The modeling completes work for the World Bank that was released in 2018 as volume 1 of Groundswell.

News Headlines
#130454
2021-09-15

Centre of Biodiversity Research opens in Leipzig

Today, the Minister-Presidents of Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia inaugurated the Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research - iDiv) in Leipzig. The centre began operating in 2020 and since then 300 researchers have started ...

News Headlines
#130455
2021-09-15

Life-sized camel carvings in Northern Arabia date to the Neolithic period

The monumental reliefs at the Camel Site in northern Arabia are unique: three rock spurs are decorated with naturalistic, life-sized carvings of camels and equids. In total, 21 reliefs have been identified.

News Headlines
#130457
2021-09-15

New autonomous method precisely detects endangered whale vocalizations

The North Atlantic Right Whale (Right whale) is one of the most endangered whale species in the world with only about 368 remaining off the east coast of North America.

News Headlines
#130458
2021-09-15

How plants sense phosphate

A new study by the University of Bonn and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) in Gatersleben sheds light on the mechanism used by plants to monitor how much of the nutrient phosphate is available, and to decide when strategies to mobilize and take up more phosph ...

News Headlines
#130460
2021-09-15

A warm Indian Ocean drives anomalous weather events in East Asia

An unusually warm winter in 2019/20 in central China and Japan was followed by a summer that saw record-breaking rainfall in the region, triggering severe flooding and landslides.

News Headlines
#130461
2021-09-15

Research initiative to build framework for climate-smart sustainable agricultural soil management

Healthy soil is something most of us take for granted, but it is crucial for life. As one of our most vital resources, we depend upon it for the food we eat, the textiles we wear and the wood we use to build our homes.

News Headlines
#130462
2021-09-15

Are there DBPs in that cup of tea?

Surpassed only by water, tea is the second most consumed beverage worldwide. When boiled tap water is used to brew tea, residual chlorine in the water can react with tea compounds to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology measured 60 ...

News Headlines
#130389
2021-09-14

Increasing prevalence of chronic wasting disease in Kansas deer

Researchers at the University of Missouri have found chronic wasting disease—a fatal illness found in deer that affects their neurological system and causes chronic weight loss—has spread fivefold among Kansas counties, raising concerns about the spread of the disease and the importance of educa ...

News Headlines
#130390
2021-09-14

Which species will be our urban neighbours?

All over the world, people are moving out of rural areas, and cities are growing. What will be the impact on resident species that live in these cities? Which will be our new plant and animal neighbors, which will have to leave town, and what does that mean for us humans?

News Headlines
#130391
2021-09-14

'The pigs can smell man': How decimation of Borneo's rainforests threatens both hunters and hunted

For more than 40,000 years, Indigenous communities in Borneo have hunted and eaten bearded pigs—huge, nomadic animals that roam the island in Southeast Asia. These 100kg creatures are central to the livelihood and culture of some Bornean peoples—in fact, some hunters rarely talk of anything else.

News Headlines
#130392
2021-09-14

Troubled waters: How global marine wildlife protection can undermine fishing communities

New research led by the University of Oxford, published in Conservation Letters, has examined the conflict between small-scale fisheries and marine mammals, using the experience of fisheries on the west coast of South America to highlight a worldwide issue.

News Headlines
#130393
2021-09-14

Video: Why ice core research matters

Inside the New Zealand Ice Core Research Facility, scientists like Dr. Holly Winton from the Te Puna Pātiotio—Antarctic Research Centre at Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington analyze ice core samples to understand how and why the climate changed in the past, to better predict our f ...

News Headlines
#130396
2021-09-14

Degradation of biobased plastics in the soil: Microbial community defies climate change

The idea of biodegradable plastics sounds good at first. However, very little is known about how they are degraded in the soil and how this is influenced by climate change. In two recent studies, soil ecologists at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have shown which microbial ...

News Headlines
#130397
2021-09-14

How much will our oceans warm and cause sea levels to rise this century?

Knowing how much sea levels are likely to rise during this century is vital to our understanding of future climate change, but previous estimates have generated wide ranges of uncertainty.

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