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News Headlines
#122852
2019-11-04

Ban on destructive fishing practice helps species recovery in Indonesian park

Fish stocks in a marine national park in Indonesia increased significantly in the years after a ban on the use of coral-destroying nets was imposed, a recent study has found.

News Headlines
#122856
2019-11-04

Shark skin microbiome resists infection

A survey of the shark skin microbiome provides the first step toward understanding the remarkable resilience of shark wounds to infection.

News Headlines
#122857
2019-11-04

Puffins make poor diet choices when the chips are down

A new study has shown that Britain's puffins may struggle to adapt to changes in their North Sea feeding grounds and researchers are calling for better use of marine protection areas (MPAs) to help protect the country's best known seabirds. Britain's coasts support globally important populations ...

News Headlines
#122858
2019-11-04

The world is getting wetter, yet water may become less available for North America and Eurasia

With climate change, plants of the future will consume more water than in the present day, leading to less water available for people living in North America and Eurasia, according to a Dartmouth-led study in Nature Geoscience. The research suggests a drier future despite anticipated precipitati ...

News Headlines
#122859
2019-11-04

Revealing interior temperature of Antarctic ice sheet

As ESA's SMOS satellite celebrates 10 years in orbit, yet another result has been added to its list of successes. This remarkable satellite mission has shown that it can be used to measure how the temperature of the Antarctic ice sheet changes with depth—and it's much warmer deep down.

News Headlines
#122866
2019-11-04

To save biodiversity, scientists suggest 'mega-conservation'

While the conservation of charismatic creatures like pandas, elephants and snow leopards are important in their own right, there may be no better ecological bang-for-our-buck than a sound, science-based effort to save widespread keystone systems. And the majestic aspens could be a perfect start ...

News Headlines
#122826
2019-11-01

Coral study challenges long-held scientific theory: Aussie research

A world-first Australian study of coral has challenged long-held scientific assumptions about the role of sunlight in creating biodiversity, with impacts potentially extending far beyond the reef.

News Headlines
#122833
2019-11-01

What drives circadian rhythms in the polar regions?

In temperate latitudes, the right timing is crucial for almost all living things: Plants sprout with the advent of spring, bees know the best times to visit flowers, people get tired in the evening and wake up again in the morning.

News Headlines
#122834
2019-11-01

Food waste in tourism is a bigger issue than previously thought

There are major gaps in how food waste in tourism is understood and calculated, according to researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Southern California. Food waste originating from hotels, restaurants and events is recognised and can be estimated and calculated, b ...

News Headlines
#122835
2019-11-01

Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios

Rice is the largest global staple crop, consumed by more than half the world's population—but new experiments from Stanford University suggest that with climate change, production in major rice-growing regions with endemic soil arsenic will undergo a dramatic decline and jeopardize critical food ...

News Headlines
#122836
2019-11-01

The largest seabirds in the North Atlantic travel hundreds of miles just to catch food

Gannets, the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic, can travel hundreds of miles from their homes just to catch food for their chicks. However, with around a million square miles of ocean to choose from, it has always been a mystery how they decide where is best to search for fish.

News Headlines
#122837
2019-11-01

Echolocation found to be cheap for deep-diving whales

A new international study led by Aarhus University in Denmark, in collaboration with the Universities of St Andrews and La Laguna, Tenerife, reveals how whales have evolved to live in the world's deepest oceans.

News Headlines
#122838
2019-11-01

Soil bacteria found to use several approaches in 'suppressive soils' to protect plants

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in The Netherlands and two in Brazil has discovered how some soil bacteria protect crops against a fungal disease. In their paper published in the journal Science, they describe their transcriptional analysis of several types of soil bac ...

News Headlines
#122813
2019-10-31

Study shows how climate change may affect environmental conservation areas

Brazil contains the largest expanse of tropical ecosystems within protected areas, but a significant proportion of these reserves may be vulnerable to the effects of ongoing global climate change, according to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology.

News Headlines
#122820
2019-10-31

Vampire bats give a little help to their 'friends'

Vampire bats could be said to be sort of like people—not because of their blood-sucking ways, but because they help their neighbors in need even if it's of no obvious benefit to them.

News Headlines
#122821
2019-10-31

Climate engineering should not be considered a public good, new research shows

Countries around the world are preparing to modify the earth's climate to cope with climate change, with many proponents touting it as a "public good."

News Headlines
#122796
2019-10-30

Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle

Marine sediments play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle due to the oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration of the organisms that live in and on the ocean floor. To help predict the changing contribution of this respiration to the carbon cycle in a warming world, researchers from the Royal ...

News Headlines
#122797
2019-10-30

The use of sugarcane straw for bioenergy is an opportunity, but there are pros and cons

The use of sugarcane leaves, known as trash or straw, to produce electricity and second-generation (2G) ethanol has been advocated as a means of increasing bioenergy generation without expanding cropland acreage. However, a study conducted in Brazil and published in the journal BioEnergy Researc ...

News Headlines
#122798
2019-10-30

Parasite manipulates algal metabolism for its own benefit

Microalgae can form massive assemblages in oceans, attracting many opportunistic organisms; these are capable of eliminating the entire algal population within a short time. However, the underlying mechanisms of this watery arms race are largely unknown. In a new publication in Nature Communicat ...

News Headlines
#122805
2019-10-30

Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards

Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide. That is according to a study published today from the Uni ...

News Headlines
#122808
2019-10-30

Robust evidence of declines in insect abundance and biodiversity

There are certain times in life — whether in our relationships, personal health or scientific research — when we think that we know something but the evidence is less than conclusive. An accumulation of clues or symptoms might suggest a particular interpretation without being strong enough to cl ...

News Headlines
#122775
2019-10-29

Why plants panic when it rains

An international team of scientists involving The University of Western Australia's School of Molecular Sciences, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and Lund University has made the surprising discovery that a plant's reaction to rain is close to one of panic.

News Headlines
#122776
2019-10-29

Hot as shell: birds in cooler climates lay darker eggs to keep their embryos warm

Birds lay eggs with a huge variety of colours and patterns, from immaculate white to a range of blue-greens and reddish browns.The need to conceal eggs from predators is one factor that gives rise to all kinds of camouflaged and hard-to-spot appearances.

News Headlines
#122777
2019-10-29

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes

You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi.

News Headlines
#122778
2019-10-29

Stripes can help prey stay hidden on the move, our new research reveals

For prey in the animal kingdom, one wrong move can mean death. Species have evolved camouflage to blend into their environment – some moths may share the colour of the tree bark they rest on while a lizard might resemble the sandy yellow of its desert home. But what about when these animals need ...

News Headlines
#122780
2019-10-29

A Key to Coral Bleaching Events? Location, Location, Location

New research indicates that longitude, as well as warming waters, may be a key predictor of coral bleaching events. Understanding the causes of coral bleaching events is an important goal for conservationists across the globe.

News Headlines
#122781
2019-10-29

Extinction of cold-water corals on the Namibian shelf due to low oxygen contents

Researchers have only been aware of the existence of fossil cold-water corals off the coast of Namibia since 2016. But it was not known when and why the cold-water corals in this region became extinct. By dating fossil coral fragments, Leonardo Tamborrino of MARUM—Center for Marine Environmental ...

News Headlines
#122755
2019-10-28

Deep dive into Earth's interior shows change isn't skin deep

They say it's what's on the inside that counts. And so it goes with the planet's surface; from mountain ranges to a river's drainage, the deep Earth has a profound influence on what's happening on top.

News Headlines
#122756
2019-10-28

Make fungi think they're starving to stop them having sex, say scientists

Tricking fungi into thinking they're starving could be the key to slowing down our evolutionary arms race with fungal pathogens, as hungry fungi don't want to have sex.

News Headlines
#122757
2019-10-28

Lend me a flipper: Dolphins and cooperation

Cooperation is one of the most important abilities for any social species. From hunting, breeding, and child rearing, it has allowed many animals—including humans—to survive and thrive. As we better understand the details on how animals work together, researchers have been focusing on the degree ...

News Headlines
#122758
2019-10-28

Rising seas threaten low-lying coastal cities, 10% of world population

The recent Typhoon Hagibis—the most powerful storm to hit Japan since 1958—caused massive destruction. The reported death toll as of October 22 has climbed to 80, with another 398 injured and 11 people still missing

News Headlines
#122749
2019-10-25

Mountain streams emit a surprising amount of carbon dioxide

Mountains cover 25 percent of the Earth's surface, and the streams draining these mountains account for more than a third of the global runoff. But the role that mountain streams play in global carbon fluxes has not yet been evaluated; until now scientists have focused mainly on streams and rive ...

News Headlines
#122715
2019-10-24

Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in zebrafish

It is already known that zebrafish can flexibly regenerate their hearts after injury. An international research group led by Prof. Nadia Mercader of the University of Bern now shows that certain heart muscle cells play a central role in this process. The insights gained could be used to initiate ...

News Headlines
#122716
2019-10-24

Freshwater reserves under the sea

Research at Flinders University is investigating and locating vital freshwater hidden beneath the sea.Flinders University Professor of Hydrogeology Adrian Werner is making important advances in assessing freshwater reservoirs that exist beneath the ocean, potentially providing innovative answers ...

News Headlines
#122725
2019-10-24

The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied

Carnivores deliver important benefits for society, but it is their conflicts with humans that account for the majority of academic research publications, according to an international study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), in which a researcher from the University of Granada (U ...

News Headlines
#122710
2019-10-23

Looking through 'living glass', researchers discover a new genus of diatoms from India and China

Diatoms are single-celled algae that occur either solitarily or in colonies of millions, where there is moisture. However, what distinguishes these microscopic creatures from the rest of the algal groups is their enshrining and tortuous cell-wall or 'frustule', which is made up of silica. In oth ...

News Headlines
#122690
2019-10-21

Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted

Antarctica's ice sheet spans close to twice the area of the contiguous United States, and its land boundary is buttressed by massive, floating ice shelves extending hundreds of miles out over the frigid waters of the Southern Ocean. When these ice shelves collapse into the ocean, they expose tow ...

News Headlines
#122693
2019-10-21

Restoring the richness of prehistoric oceans

Scientists are reconstructing the world’s once ‘pristine’ prehistoric oceans in order to stimulate further biodiversity.As a growing global concern, ocean conservation is a priority for many environmentalists. However, researchers say that we don’t know what the oceans were like before major imp ...

News Headlines
#122694
2019-10-21

To fight climate change, science must be mobilised like it was in World War II

We’ve all but won the argument on climate change. The facts are now unequivocal and climate denialists are facing a losing battle. Concern has risen up the political agenda, and major economic institutions such as the World Trade Organisation and the Bank of England highlight the increasingly ex ...

News Headlines
#122698
2019-10-21

Tree frog rapidly changes colour in Arunachal Pradesh

Reptiles such as chameleons are famed for changing their colour and amphibians such as frogs often escape the radar. Not this time though.

News Headlines
#122706
2019-10-21

Researchers discover rat-eating monkeys acting as ‘pest control’ on Malaysia’s oil palm plantations

Macaques could reduce crop damage by rats from 10 per cent to less than 3 per cent, equivalent to a gain of around US$650 million per year, researchers said. Anna Holzner It seems like there’s monkey business afoot as scientists have discovered that some monkeys in Malaysia regularly kill and ea ...

News Headlines
#122667
2019-10-15

Behind The Power Of Giant Sharks

Led by Christopher L. Lawson, a PhD Candidate in the School of Biomedical Sciences of the University of Queensland, a group of scientists set out to learn more about the bioenergetics models for shark and rays. “A bioenergetics model describes the energy requirements of an animal and how energy ...

News Headlines
#122670
2019-10-15

Evolutionary history of oaks

Oaks have a complex evolutionary history that has long eluded scientists. New research, however, provides the most detailed account to date of the evolution of oaks, recovering the 56-million-year history that has made the oaks one of the most diverse, abundant and important woody plant groups t ...

News Headlines
#122672
2019-10-15

Habitat corridors boost biodiversity, a new study confirms

Connecting wildlife habitats has often been perceived as a way to enhance biodiversity. A new article backs up previous evidence with large-scale findings.

News Headlines
#122673
2019-10-15

Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

A new genetic engineering tool will help open the floodgates of microbial metabolite applications.

News Headlines
#122580
2019-10-09

A unique study sheds light on the ecology of the glacial relict amphipod Gammaracanthus lacustris

The glacial relict amphipod Gammaracanthus lacustris only occurs in deep and cold waters. A collaborative study by University of Jyväskylä and University of Eastern Finland produced new information on the life cycle and ecology of this rare amphipod.

News Headlines
#122581
2019-10-09

Whale 'whispers' keep young safe near predators: study

Female Atlantic right whales lower their voices to a whisper when communicating with their young in order to prevent "eavesdropping" by predators, researchers said Wednesday.

News Headlines
#122582
2019-10-09

Expert outlines pathway to net zero emissions by 2050

A key figure in the United Kingdom's decision to legislate a climate change target of net zero emissions by 2050 is in Australia.Professor Julia King (Baroness Brown of Cambridge) will give a lecture on the approach the UK is taking with hydrogen, and the policy requirements in developing such a ...

News Headlines
#122593
2019-10-09

Kangaroos and other herbivores are eating away at national parks across Australia

Protected land, including national parks, are a cornerstone of conservation. Once an area is legally protected, it is tempting to assume that it is shielded from further degradation.

News Headlines
#122566
2019-10-08

How Michigan scientists are using sound to tune into the health of the world around us.

Birds call to each other. The chirps fade as the sounds of shoes crunching on the somewhat frozen earth grow louder. Children laugh in the distance. Waves of water crash against each other.

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