English  |  Español  |  Français
Knowledge Base

Search criteria

Information Types

  • News Headlines (356)

Date

  • Added or updated since:

  • Custom range...

Subjects

  • Research and Science (356)

Search Results

The search was executed to find both database records and web content.
 
Sort by: Date Title
356 Results
Results per page: 10 25 50 100
Result 201 to 250

News Headlines
#114532
2017-09-20

Breaking legume's crop wild relative barrier

Domesticating plants to grow as crops can turn out to be a double-edged scythe.On one hand, selecting specific desirable traits, such as high yields, can increase crop productivity. But other important traits, like resistance to pests, can be lost. That can make crops vulnerable to different str ...

News Headlines
#114533
2017-09-20

10,000 year-old DNA proves when fish colonized lakes

DNA molecules in lake sediment are few and hard bound to particles. This resulted in challenging analyses and required development of new methods, both for extracting sufficiently clean DNA and for the statistical analysis of data. For this work, doctoral student Fredrik Olajos and researcher Fo ...

News Headlines
#114534
2017-09-20

It takes just 4 years to detect human warming of the oceans

We’ve known for decades that the Earth is warming, but a key question is, how fast? Another key question is whether the warming is primarily caused by human activities. If we can more precisely measure the rate of warming and the natural component, it would be useful for decision makers, legisla ...

News Headlines
#114535
2017-09-20

Winter restricts innovation—A new model for tropical plant biodiversity is based on the 'storage effect'

Based on data from 10 long-term forest monitoring plots, including seven from the Smithsonian's ForestGEO network, a team led by Jacob Usinowicz during his doctoral dissertation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides the first evidence that the 'storage effect' enables tree species to ...

News Headlines
#114491
2017-09-19

Carbon dioxide trapped by ice-age oceans raises questions for future

Over the past few decades, scientists have monitored the atmosphere and oceans using instruments, gauges and satellites. But modern climate variability remains small compared to what we can expect in the future due to human emission of carbon dioxide.

News Headlines
#114503
2017-09-19

Algae growing on snow found to cause ice field to melt faster in Alaska

A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. has found that algae growing on packed snow causes the snow to melt faster. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes testing the impact of algae growing on snow and measuring its impact on an Alaskan ...

News Headlines
#114506
2017-09-19

Method allows researchers to collect body odour samples of mammals in a non-invasive manner

Mammals communicate with each other using olfactory cues. This way they recognize relatives or friends or find a genetically suitable mate. However, to collect smells, especially in the wild, is anything but easy to accomplish. A team of researchers from the University of Leipzig and the Max Pla ...

News Headlines
#114481
2017-09-18

Antarctic Caves Warmed By Volcanic Steam May Harbor Life

Although the temperatures in caves on the world's southernmost active volcano are closer to that of a summer night than a sauna, new research suggests that even this moderate heat may make life possible there.

News Headlines
#114482
2017-09-18

Researchers develop new ultra-fast 3D microscope

A new microscope can capture 3-D images of live organisms in real time. It's called the QIs-scope, an innovation from a spinoff of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), 4D Nature. The microscope can be used in biomedical research or to improve clinical diagnosis procedures.

News Headlines
#114485
2017-09-18

Glacial melt will wreck ecosystems worldwide

Glaciers cover one-tenth of the planet’s land surface – but not for much longer. Glaciers worldwide are in retreat, and losing mass. They are shrinking and melting, and that will create problems almost everywhere, according to new research.

News Headlines
#114454
2017-09-15

Ignoring human impact on millions of invisible microbes putting lives at risk: expert

SYDNEY, Sept. 15 (Xinhua) -- A leading Australian expert warned on Friday that more needs to be done to address the potential damage being done by humans to the microbial ecology as microorganisms are critical to our survival on the planet.

News Headlines
#114455
2017-09-15

Bacterial baggage: how humans are spreading germs all over the globe

Humans are transporting trillions of bacteria around the world via tourism, food and shipping, without stopping to think about the potential damage being caused to bacterial ecosystems.

News Headlines
#114467
2017-09-15

What happened to the woolly rhino?

As time ran out for the woolly rhino, strange things happened. Before going extinct, a new study suggests, some of the beasts faced an unusually high risk of growing bizarre ribs in their neck. Those misplaced ribs might have signaled the animals’ impending demise.

News Headlines
#114434
2017-09-14

Small-scale fisheries have big impact on oceans

A new UBC study has found that small-scale fisheries may have a much larger impact on ocean ecosystems than previously thought, due to a lack of data on their development over time.

News Headlines
#114443
2017-09-14

Orchid gives up the secrets of its success

The orchid is known for its beauty and once changed hands for vast sums.Now, scientists are gaining an insight into how the plant prized for its beauty colonised almost every habitat on Earth. A team in China has unpicked the genetic blueprint of an orchid that grows wild in the mountains of sou ...

News Headlines
#114445
2017-09-14

NSF awards $14.7 million for research to deepen understanding of Earth’s biodiversity

Symbiotic bacteria -- microbes that have close and long-term relationships with their "hosts" -- are everywhere on Earth: in soil, in coral reefs, in humans. Through a new National Science Foundation (NSF) Dimensions of Biodiversity grant, scientist Joel Sachs of the University of California, Ri ...

News Headlines
#114447
2017-09-14

Baw Baw frog charms researchers in battle against extinction

Scientists are racing against time to save Victoria's unique Baw Baw frog - facing extinction from a fungus threatening a third of Australia's frog species.

News Headlines
#114411
2017-09-13

Back from the dead—how to revive a lost species

Scientists from around the world are hoping to return a lost species of giant tortoise to one of the world-famous Galápagos islands.

News Headlines
#114412
2017-09-13

New study suggests that sperm whales travel together, dine alone

Sperm whales have long been known to be highly social creatures and a new study confirms that when a group of them travel, they tend to hang pretty close together.

News Headlines
#114414
2017-09-13

In stingless bee species, queens control worker reproduction without castration

Scientists have studied the organization and function of social insect colonies since Charles Darwin (1809-1882) investigated beehives near his home in Kent with the help of his five children. Since then, prompted by the theory of evolution, researchers have scrutinized every conceivable aspect ...

News Headlines
#114418
2017-09-13

The Key to Predicting Drought and Deluge: The Ocean

Marine conditions influence rain patterns, and new research on ocean temperatures could help improve predictions on whether the American West will face wet or dry times in the years ahead.

News Headlines
#114424
2017-09-13

Underwater wireless optical communications system for streaming high quality, live video

A flexible and cost-effective technology for streaming high-quality underwater video images has been developed by researchers at KAUST by improving the bandwidth to achieve better video quality.

News Headlines
#114389
2017-09-12

Microbes in flower nectar affect pollination

Dipping its beak into the sweet nectar of a flower, a hummingbird is doing more than getting a meal – it's contributing to a microbial community that could potentially determine the fate of that flower. Recognizing that this fleeting interaction could have major implications on crop success and ...

News Headlines
#114392
2017-09-12

Biding time could improve conservation outcomes

Strategic delays in conservation efforts could be the key to protecting more species according to researchers at The University of Queensland.

News Headlines
#114393
2017-09-12

Ancient tree reveals cause of spike in Arctic temperature

A kauri tree preserved in a New Zealand peat swamp for 30,000 years has revealed a new mechanism that may explain how temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere spiked several degrees centigrade in just a few decades during the last global ice age.

News Headlines
#114396
2017-09-12

Coral research breakthrough could save Great Barrier Reef

Southern Cross University researchers say they have made a breakthrough that could help save the Great Barrier Reef. Project leader Peter Harrison has been working with a team to repair degraded reefs in the Philippines by encouraging the reproduction of coral larvae.

News Headlines
#114404
2017-09-12

Carbon cycling in forest soils research presented

Just as individual humans have different microbial communities in their guts, the microbial communities living in soils vary from site to site as well. Recent research compared the decomposition rates of wood stakes over eight sites to gain an understanding of soil microbes in forests. The activ ...

News Headlines
#114406
2017-09-12

Sweden to open plant-breeding center to meet biodiversity goals

The Swedish government plans to open a national center for plant-breeding in order to develop new species of plants that are suitable for the Swedish climate.

News Headlines
#114369
2017-09-11

University research preserve celebrates 75 years of biodiversity studies

A University of Minnesota research reserve, known for its role in biodiversity studies, recently celebrated 75 years of work.Since the launch of the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in 1942, researchers at the site have studied subjects ranging from controlled burns to tree disease, some of ...

News Headlines
#114371
2017-09-11

New device zooms in on microbe behaviour at the right scale

Marine microbes play an important role in the productivity and functioning of our oceans but scientists studying their behaviour face many challenges.

News Headlines
#114338
2017-09-06

Research Dog Helps Scientists Save Endangered Carnivores

Scat-sniffing research dogs are helping scientists map out a plan to save reclusive jaguars, pumas, bush dogs and other endangered carnivores in the increasingly fragmented forests of northeastern Argentina, according to a new study from Washington University in St. Louis.

News Headlines
#114341
2017-09-06

Underwater technology makes ocean floor a laboratory for deep sea sponges

Advanced Canadian technology is allowing scientists off Nova Scotia to carry out tests on the ocean floor that once had to be done inside the laboratory.

News Headlines
#114346
2017-09-06

Swansea Uni study: African wild dogs 'sneeze to vote'

African wild dogs vote over pack decisions by sneezing, a new study has found. The joint research by academics from Swansea, Australia and the United States monitored endangered dogs at the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust. They found the dogs used sneezes to decide when to move off to hunt ...

News Headlines
#114347
2017-09-06

Unprecedented levels of nitrogen could pose risks to Earth's environment

Human production of fixed nitrogen, used mostly to fertilize crops, now accounts for about half of the total fixed nitrogen added to the Earth both on land and in the oceans, according to a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University.

News Headlines
#114321
2017-09-05

Diverse landscapes are more productive and adapt better to climate change

Ecosystems with high biodiversity are more productive and stable towards annual fluctuations in environmental conditions than those with a low diversity of species. They also adapt better to climate-driven environmental changes. These are the key findings environmental scientists at the Universi ...

News Headlines
#114331
2017-09-05

Clues Found That Earth May Have a Thermostat Set to “Habitable”

n 1981 geologists proposed that the chemical weathering of rocks like granite can draw the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere and, in the process, cool Earth. As cooling progressed, chemical weathering reaction rates would decrease, more CO2 would remain in the air, and wa ...

News Headlines
#114292
2017-09-01

How Fire Ants Form Giant Rafts to Survive Floods

Drop a clump of 100,000 fire ants in a pond of water – or flood a huge area of Texas that’s infested with fire ants and drive them out of their nests in large groups. In minutes the clump will flatten and spread into a circular pancake that can float for weeks without drowning the ants.

News Headlines
#114293
2017-09-01

How these ants bite at jaw-dropping speed, 700 times faster than you can blink

The ant stalks the forest floor, its antennas alert and its mouth agape. Its sideways jaws are edged with menacing teeth and held so far open they extend back behind the its head. There’s a twitch in the leaf litter – a tasty bug called a springtail emerges. In an instant, one seven-hundredth of ...

News Headlines
#114306
2017-09-01

New research unlocks the mystery of leaf size

Why is a banana leaf a million times bigger than a common heather leaf? Why are leaves generally much larger in tropical jungles than in temperate forests and deserts? The textbooks say it's a balance between water availability and overheating.

News Headlines
#114307
2017-09-01

Coastal wetlands dramatically reduce property losses during hurricanes

With the Atlantic hurricane season well under way and Tropical Storm Harvey causing devastation in Texas, a new scientific study reports that coastal wetlands significantly reduce annual flood losses and catastrophic damages from storms. Led by a team of scientists from the engineering, insuranc ...

News Headlines
#114311
2017-09-01

Researchers Discover Italy’s Oldest Wine in Sicilian Cave

Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello—Italian wines are some of the best in the world. And there’s a reason for that: They've been making it for thousands of years. Now, a new find suggests they've been at it even longer than people thought. As Lorenzo Tondo at The Guardian reports, researchers have foun ...

News Headlines
#114265
2017-08-31

Higher levels of cooperation for provision than for maintenance of public goods

Dr. Felix Koelle, a research fellow at the Faculty of Management, Economics, and Social Sciences at the University of Cologne, led a team studying how the paradigm of reciprocity influences public goods. Participants (n = 876) in a series of experiments and simulations were asked to either maint ...

News Headlines
#114281
2017-08-31

Antidepressants found in fish brains in Great Lakes region

Researchers have found concentrations of human antidepressants in 10 kinds of fish in the Niagara River, which links Lake Erie with Lake Ontario.Active ingredients in Zoloft, Prozac and other happy-pills were discovered to be built up in the brains of smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, rudd, rock ...

News Headlines
#114241
2017-08-30

Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need

New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals.

News Headlines
#114243
2017-08-30

X-ray micro-CT enhanced revision of the ant genus Zasphinctus Wheeler

Biologists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have named three new, rare ant species in Africa after important figures in African biodiversity conservation—a former United States president, a writer-activist, and a world-renowned scientist. Using new sc ...

News Headlines
#114245
2017-08-30

Researchers tackle methane emissions with gas-guzzling bacteria

An international research team co-led by a Monash biologist has shown that methane-oxidising bacteria – key organisms responsible for greenhouse gas mitigation – are more flexible and resilient than previously thought.

News Headlines
#114255
2017-08-30

A new estimate of biodiversity on Earth

Anyone who has studied biology, watched a nature documentary, or, for that matter, simply enjoyed time in the outdoors, has likely been amazed by the variety of plant and animal life on our planet.To date, about 1.5 million species have been formally described in the scientific literature, most ...

News Headlines
#114256
2017-08-30

Researchers produce a biocell as effective as a platinum fuel cell

Making a biocell that is as effective as a platinum fuel cell: that's the feat that researchers in the Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) have achieved, in collaboration with the Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CNRS/Université de Bordeaux) ...

News Headlines
#114224
2017-08-29

After Mass Extinction, Earth’s Ocean Was Jurassic Dead Zone

A mass extinction event that wiped out the majority of the world’s creatures was made worse because the Earth’s ocean had almost no oxygen for thousands of years afterward.Scientists reported in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems that they studied rock formations to determine how m ...

News Headlines
#114227
2017-08-29

MIT Inspired by Sea Worm for Material That Can Adapt to Its Environment

Researchers often find themselves inspired by nature to develop new materials and technology, a practice called biomimicry. In a recent example of this type of work, a team at MIT has used a sea worm for inspiration to develop new material—well suited for soft robots—that can adapt to changing e ...

Results per page: 10 25 50 100
Result 201 to 250
Results for: ("News Headlines") AND ("Research and Science")
  • United Nations
  • United Nations Environment Programme